Tombstone Restoration Commission

Tombstone Restoration Commission The Tombstone Restoration Commission (TRC), comprised of private citizens committed to historic preservation, rehabilitation, and conservation, was established in 1949.

TRC has been integral to the survival of numerous historic buildings, most notably the 1882 Tombstone Courthouse, which served as a courthouse until 1929. This Victorian building stood empty until 1955, when TRC began restoration. In 1959, it was reborn as a museum, and today it houses priceless collections, original documents, and thousands of artifacts

Operating as usual

👉🏼Thank you Tombstone Chamber of Commerce for the ribbon cutting celebrating the grand opening of the refurbished caboos...
04/16/2021

👉🏼Thank you Tombstone Chamber of Commerce for the ribbon cutting celebrating the grand opening of the refurbished caboose! Also thanks to The Tombstone Vigilantes for attending & for letting us use your sound system, the Tombstone Vigilettes for including us to the Rose Festival🌹Mayor Escapule and to everyone who attended!!! Also The Longhorn Restaurant - Tombstone AZ for donating cookies & water!

04/13/2021

Just in case you missed it, we had a great turnout at the ribbon cutting and we are excited to continue to update the depot area🚂💨

👉🏼Today’s the day, 1pm!!! It’s more than a ribbon cutting for us, it’s a reintroduction🏚🤠 After the ribbon cutting, you ...
04/10/2021

👉🏼Today’s the day, 1pm!!! It’s more than a ribbon cutting for us, it’s a reintroduction🏚🤠 After the ribbon cutting, you will have the opportunity to walk thru the caboose and also to purchase any of these items (most items are no longer in production, so while supplies last, cash only) ...You are not only purchasing a collectors piece, you are supporting the restoration of Tombstone’s history!!!

👉🏼Today’s the day, 1pm!!! It’s more than a ribbon cutting for us, it’s a reintroduction🏚🤠 After the ribbon cutting, you will have the opportunity to walk thru the caboose and also to purchase any of these items (most items are no longer in production, so while supplies last, cash only) ...You are not only purchasing a collectors piece, you are supporting the restoration of Tombstone’s history!!!

Nice article in the Sierra Vista Herald 🚂💨
04/09/2021
Celebrating Tombstone's railroad connection

Nice article in the Sierra Vista Herald 🚂💨

TOMBSTONE — In celebration of the first train to roll through Tombstone 118 years ago, the Tombstone Restoration Commission is hosting a ribbon cutting ceremony dedicated to a newly renovated

👉🏼Another great item for sale 1 PM Saturday, during ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Southern Pacific Caboose which is loc...
04/07/2021

👉🏼Another great item for sale 1 PM Saturday, during ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Southern Pacific Caboose which is located behind the Reading Station Library (4th and Toughnut).
👉🏼We are selling a very small amount these rare 1929 Bank of Helldorado coins... this will help raise funds for our 'restore the box car' project!

👉🏼Another great item for sale 1 PM Saturday, during ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Southern Pacific Caboose which is located behind the Reading Station Library (4th and Toughnut).
👉🏼We are selling a very small amount these rare 1929 Bank of Helldorado coins... this will help raise funds for our 'restore the box car' project!

🎀 At the ribbon cutting Saturday there will be a few items (no longer in production) for purchase, while available...The...
04/06/2021

🎀 At the ribbon cutting Saturday there will be a few items (no longer in production) for purchase, while available...These coins for example...

🎀 At the ribbon cutting Saturday there will be a few items (no longer in production) for purchase, while available...These coins for example...

Walking around town town you might have noticed these historical plaques that give a brief description of the building t...
03/31/2021

Walking around town town you might have noticed these historical plaques that give a brief description of the building that would have been (or is) located in that spot during sometime in the 1800's. This was another project from the Tombstone Restoration Commission, in cooperation with local merchant's. These signs are only a small part of the story, there is actually a small book that corresponds with these plaques that offer the opportunity for a very interesting walking tour.
*These books will be available for purchase at our ribbon cutting Saturday, April 10 and are available at a variety of businesses around town for only $10.

Walking around town town you might have noticed these historical plaques that give a brief description of the building that would have been (or is) located in that spot during sometime in the 1800's. This was another project from the Tombstone Restoration Commission, in cooperation with local merchant's. These signs are only a small part of the story, there is actually a small book that corresponds with these plaques that offer the opportunity for a very interesting walking tour.
*These books will be available for purchase at our ribbon cutting Saturday, April 10 and are available at a variety of businesses around town for only $10.

Yay🎉 We are very excited about being active in Tombstone and being able to share it with the community thru social media...
03/30/2021

Yay🎉 We are very excited about being active in Tombstone and being able to share it with the community thru social media! This is just the beginning, please like and share our posts🤠

Yay🎉 We are very excited about being active in Tombstone and being able to share it with the community thru social media! This is just the beginning, please like and share our posts🤠

Join us for the ribbon cutting 🎀🚂💨
03/29/2021

Join us for the ribbon cutting 🎀🚂💨

Join us for the ribbon cutting 🎀🚂💨

Currently we are working on the train depot area where we are creating a museum! The grand opening ribbon cutting is Sat...
03/24/2021

Currently we are working on the train depot area where we are creating a museum! The grand opening ribbon cutting is Saturday April 10, 2021 at 1pm after the Rose Festival Parade🌹If you have old west train related items you’d like to donate, we be happy to speak with you, we are a 501(C)3 organization 🚂💨

Thank you for sharing!
03/22/2021

Thank you for sharing!

Another project the the TRC has invested time and funds on are the 1800's style lights and the wooden boardwalks... Wher...
03/22/2021

Another project the the TRC has invested time and funds on are the 1800's style lights and the wooden boardwalks... Where, if you stand real still, you might be able to hear the jingle of spurs if you listen hard enough....

Another project the the TRC has invested time and funds on are the 1800's style lights and the wooden boardwalks... Where, if you stand real still, you might be able to hear the jingle of spurs if you listen hard enough....

One of the TRC past projects was restoration of Schieffelin Hall...picture representation of the hall circa early 1900’s...
03/18/2021

One of the TRC past projects was restoration of Schieffelin Hall...picture representation of the hall circa early 1900’s, 1960’s & 2000’s

One of the TRC past projects was restoration of Schieffelin Hall...picture representation of the hall circa early 1900’s, 1960’s & 2000’s

Did you know that The Tombstone Reading Station was once the Southern Pacific Railroad Depot? Originally, the Tombstone ...
03/15/2021

Did you know that The Tombstone Reading Station was once the Southern Pacific Railroad Depot? Originally, the Tombstone Restoration Commission (TRC) helped turn that building in the current City Library! That’s why most recently the TRC worked to organize and fund some work to spruce up the exterior!

Did you know that The Tombstone Reading Station was once the Southern Pacific Railroad Depot? Originally, the Tombstone Restoration Commission (TRC) helped turn that building in the current City Library! That’s why most recently the TRC worked to organize and fund some work to spruce up the exterior!

For over a half a century Tombstone  Restoration Commission (TRC) members have organized volunteers and resources to pro...
03/12/2021

For over a half a century Tombstone Restoration Commission (TRC) members have organized volunteers and resources to provide ongoing preservation and restoration throughout the historic town of Tombstone. In 2016 the TRC participated with the Tombstone Chamber of Commerce efforts to help renovate the old city hall building by donating $20,000 to reroof the old City Hall...

For over a half a century Tombstone Restoration Commission (TRC) members have organized volunteers and resources to provide ongoing preservation and restoration throughout the historic town of Tombstone. In 2016 the TRC participated with the Tombstone Chamber of Commerce efforts to help renovate the old city hall building by donating $20,000 to reroof the old City Hall...

This is a great article on some of the history of the train in Tombstone Arizona 🚂💨
03/11/2021
The Train To Tombstone: Arizona Territory, 1903.

This is a great article on some of the history of the train in Tombstone Arizona 🚂💨

The turn of the 20th century came and went without Tombstone achieving its dream of a railroad: a train to Tombstone.

A shout out 🗣THANK YOU to the Tombstone High School JROTC and Robert Davenport from the Tombstone's Goodenough Mine Tour...
03/09/2021

A shout out 🗣THANK YOU to the Tombstone High School JROTC and Robert Davenport from the Tombstone's Goodenough Mine Tour
for lending hand and their muscles and machinery 💪🏼 to help us re-landscape the front of the Tombstone Reading Station 🚂 📘

Address

515 East Toughnut Street
Tombstone, AZ
85638

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Comments

TRC setting the track between the box car and the caboose. Robert Davenport and Bob Ramirez.
GREETINGS FELLOW TOMBSTONERS! 😀 (and my other FB friends) Congratulations to the Tombstone Restoration Committee. It’s nice to see that the TRC is succeeding in accomplishing some of their long term goals. I will admit that the town is not the same town I grew up in 60 to 70 years ago, so it’s hard for me to embrace some of the changes that have been made. BUT, I recognize that much of what’s been done is to attract tourists to town — that’s always been the goal. And, I support that goal, so if the town has to look differently than I remember — so be it. (I know. I know. This comment will earn me some boos and hisses. I realize it is still a community where people work and live, and that’s a good thing.) The purpose of this post is not to editorialize about the town’s appearance today, but to share a little history about the Tombstone Restoration committee. Much of what is included here is from my memory, so please feel free to correct any factual errors. As I recall the TRC was formed in the early 1950s by a group of forward thinking Tombstoners, and was led by a woman named Edna Landin. Edna Landin was a strong supporter of Tombstone, and saw its potential to become a popular tourist attraction. The problem back then was, that while Tombstone enjoyed world-wide name recognition, and had a number of sites and buildings that had historical significance, it didn’t look like an old western town — it looked too ordinary. On the surface, it looked too much like small town America. The period storefront facades, board sidewalks, intimate lighting, dirt streets — these were all part of her dream. They turned out to be very difficult and expensive to implement, so not a lot happened for a number of years. Fast forward 50-60 years and much of what she envisioned has happened. Another significant event since then, is the the development of the Internet. At that time, nobody could have foreseen what a substantial impact the Internet would have on Tombstone. Now, world-wide communication, marketing and advertising have become very inexpensive. I’m including a cartoon drawn in 1958 (63 years ago) by a friend of mine, Margo McMenemy. While some may view this cartoon as making a derogatory comment about the Tombstone Restoration committee, Margo’s intent was exactly the opposite. She was trying to communicate the tenuous position the TRC was in at the moment, and how desperately financial support, and political support, were needed from Tombstone residents. As I mentioned earlier, I knew Margo and happened to be around while she was drawing this cartoon, so I have a couple of trivia items to share. First, there’s a lot of detail in it, that becomes apparent if you study it a bit —the Earps, the gunfights, the cowboy riding his horse under the bottom rung of the ladder. But, the two bits of trivia I wanted to point out are: The woman standing at the top of the rickety ladder was supposed to be Edna Landin herself. Margo told me this at the time, but I don’t think it was ever documented. This is a little more personal for Margo. If you look near the bottom of the cartoon, near the middle, you can see an artist sitting at an easel. Margo put this artist in to represent her husband, Rudolph G. Guzzardi. You can Google both Margo and Rudy and learn a little more about them. Rudy was a better known artist than Margo, but Margo was very talented. So, congratulations to Tombstone, the TRC and all the hardworking people that have participated in the restoration efforts!😀👍 I’m sure someone keeps track of the number of visitors from year to year. Notwithstanding, our Covid year, my guess would be that the numbers are increasing every year.😀 (BTW — What has happened to The Enna Landin park? I don’t hear anything about it anymore.) DON’T FORGET THE FIRST TOMBSTONE HIGH SCHOOL CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION ON THE WEEKEND OF OCTOBER 22-24, 2021, IN TOMBSTONE!!!!! STAY TOONED FOR DETAILS.
GREETINGS FELLOW TOMBSTONERS! 😀 (and my other FB friends) Congratulations to the Tombstone Restoration Committee. It’s nice to see that the TRC is succeeding in accomplishing some of their long term goals. I will admit that the town is not the same town I grew up in 60 to 70 years ago, so it’s hard for me to embrace some of the changes that have been made. BUT, I recognize that much of what’s been done is to attract tourists to town — that’s always been the goal. And, I support that goal, so if the town has to look like a Western Theme Park — so be it. (I know. I know. This comment will earn me some boos and hisses. I realize it is still a community where people work and live, and that’s a good thing.) The purpose of this post is not to editorialize about the town’s appearance today, but to share a little history about the Tombstone Restoration committee. Much of what is included here is from my memory, so please feel free to correct any factual errors. As I recall the TRC was formed in the early 1950s by a group of forward thinking Tombstoners, and was led by a woman named Edna Landin. Edna Landin was a strong supporter of Tombstone, and saw its potential to become a popular tourist attraction. The problem back then was, that while Tombstone enjoyed world-wide name recognition, and had a number of sites and buildings that had historical significance, it didn’t look like an old western town — it looked too ordinary. On the surface, it looked too much like small town America. The period storefront facades, board sidewalks, intimate lighting, dirt streets — these were all part of her dream. They turned out to be very difficult and expensive to implement, so not a lot happened for a number of years. Fast forward 50-60 years and much of what she envisioned has happened. Another significant event since then, is the the development of the Internet. At that time, nobody could have foreseen what a substantial impact the Internet would have on Tombstone. Now, world-wide communication, marketing and advertising have become very inexpensive. I’m including a cartoon drawn in 1958 (63 years ago) by a friend of mine, Margo McMenemy. While some may view this cartoon as making a derogatory comment about the Tombstone Restoration committee, Margo’s intent was exactly the opposite. She was trying to communicate the tenuous position the TRC was in at the moment, and how desperately financial support, and political support, were needed from Tombstone residents. As I mentioned earlier, I knew Margo and happened to be around while she was drawing this cartoon, so I have a couple of trivia items to share. First, there’s a lot of detail in it, that becomes apparent if you study it a bit —the Earps, the gunfights, the cowboy riding his horse under the bottom rung of the ladder. But, the two bits of trivia I wanted to point out are: The woman standing at the top of the rickety ladder was supposed to be Edna Landin herself. Margo told me this at the time, but I don’t think it was ever documented. This is a little more personal for Margo. If you look near the bottom of the cartoon, near the middle, you can see an artist sitting at an easel. Margo put this artist in to represent her husband, Rudolph G. Guzzardi. You can Google both Margo and Rudy and learn a little more about them. Rudy was a better known artist than Margo, but Margo was very talented. So, congratulations to Tombstone, the TRC and all the hardworking people that have participated in the restoration efforts!😀👍 I’m sure someone keeps track of the number of visitors from year to year. Notwithstanding, our Covid year, my guess would be that the numbers are increasing every year.😀 (BTW — What has happened to The Enna Landin park? I don’t hear anything about it anymore.) DON’T FORGET THE FIRST TOMBSTONE HIGH SCHOOL CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION ON THE WEEKEND OF OCTOBER 22-24, 2021, IN TOMBSTONE!!!!! STAY TOONED FOR DETAILS.
This book is designed to share the history of this unique town. In this book you will find a map of Tombstone in the early 1880s and a brief history of the historic locations. Take a walking tour with this book. You can purchase at Tombstone Boothill Graveyard gift shop, Good Enough Mine Tour, Friends of the Library, Rose Tree and from TRC.