Metropolitan St Louis Equal Housing and Opportunity Council

Metropolitan St Louis Equal Housing and Opportunity Council We are the only private, not-for-profit fair housing enforcement agency working to end illegal housing discrimination in the Metropolitan St.
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Louis area. Fair Housing Complaint Intake, Counseling, and Enforcement; Tenant Education / Homeless Prevention Counseling; Fair Housing Training; Consulting; also host many workshops!

Louis area. Fair Housing Complaint Intake, Counseling, and Enforcement; Tenant Education / Homeless Prevention Counseling; Fair Housing Training; Consulting; also host many workshops!

Mission: Metropolitan St. Louis Equal Housing and Opportunity Council seeks to ensure equal access to housing and places of public accommodation for all people through education, counseling, investigation, and enforcement.

Operating as usual

10/15/2020

"According to the paper, a lack of opportunity to refinance a home contributes partially to higher interest rates for Black homeowners. In addition, because mortgage payment rates are based on perceived risk factors like credit score and loan size, Black buyers are likely to end up paying higher rates.

The authors conclude that a policy response should eliminate the cost differential between Black and white homeowners, and assert that federal, state, and local policies should be reformed to create a more equitable system."

"Last year, 2019, data cited by the report show Black families remained the most likely racial group to be denied a mort...
10/14/2020
The Economic and Social Costs of Black Inequality

"Last year, 2019, data cited by the report show Black families remained the most likely racial group to be denied a mortgage for home purchase or refinance. Denial rates for Black applicants seeking to refinance their mortgages to a lower interest rate were more than double that of Black applicants seeking to purchase a home. The rate of rejection on home purchase was slightly over 15% and rejections to refinance was 35%.

By comparison, denial rates for white mortgage applicants were respectively 5% and 15% for home purchase and refinance. The higher denial rate for Black families, according to the report, was due to: higher debt-to-income ratios, poor credit histories, and incomplete applications.

This finding mirrors an analysis of 2019 Home Mortgage Disclosure Act data by the Center for Responsible Lending (CRL) that found the share of home purchase loans made to Black and Latino borrowers remained below their population share. Although Blacks comprise 13.4% of the population, they represented 7% of loans. Similarly, Latinos are 18.3% of the total population but received 9.2% of loans."

“As one of the leading executives on Wall Street, I am still seen first as a six-foot-four, two-hundred-pound Black man wherever I go. I could have been George Floyd.” –

"Evidence suggests nonrecurrent, short-term (NRST) benefits, often called TANF diversion payments, are better suited tha...
10/14/2020
How States Can Use TANF to Fund Rental Assistance and Prevent Evictions

"Evidence suggests nonrecurrent, short-term (NRST) benefits, often called TANF diversion payments, are better suited than cash assistance to help renters avoid eviction. NRST benefits are usually a lump sum equal to around four months of cash assistance payments and address short-term needs, including rent delinquencies, court fees, and utilities.

Although federal NRST requirements are less restrictive than cash assistance requirements, it’s still up to states whether NRST benefits can provide sufficient financial assistance for renters. States that set maximum payments below the four-month federal standard, count NRST benefits toward the 60-month lifetime cash-assistance limit, and create long periods of TANF ineligibility can increase financial instability for renters and reduce the program’s effectiveness at preventing eviction."

Flexible federal spending guidelines make TANF well positioned to fill funding gaps in rental assistance programs.

"After years of presenting on racial economic inequality and the racial wealth divide, I have learned that it is essenti...
10/13/2020
Valuing Black Lives and Black Cities — Shelterforce

"After years of presenting on racial economic inequality and the racial wealth divide, I have learned that it is essential to attack head-on the myths and false narratives that justify racial economic inequality before one can begin to approach solutions to this issue. One must face the underlying myth that the United States is the land of economic mobility and that there is a robust middle class that all have equal access to, if they are willing to put in the individual effort. Andre M. Perry’s Know Your Price: Valuing Black Lives and Property in America’s Black Cities reveals the web of historical and contemporary socioeconomic barriers that maintain the racial wealth divide and does this through personal narrative, history, and an exploration of a wide array of social issues."

"Know Your Price" by Andre M. Perry reveals the historical and contemporary socioeconomic barriers that maintain the racial wealth divide.

"'We’re doing it from a community revitalization lens,' says Butler. 'Most developers are not doing the work from that l...
10/13/2020
Can Chicago Develop Chicago?

"'We’re doing it from a community revitalization lens,' says Butler. 'Most developers are not doing the work from that lens, and I understand that, but I’m hoping to at least partner with some of those or inspire others to do it from a community lens.'

Butler completes her first project as a developer at a moment when there is much to worry about but also much to look forward to as a new, community-oriented developer on the South Side of Chicago."

There is much to worry about but also much to look forward to for community-oriented developers in Chicago.

"With April 1 looming, Morales realized she had two options: pay her portion of the rent or spend that money on food and...
10/12/2020
As the Nation Braces for a Wave of Evictions, Some Bronx Tenants Fight Back

"With April 1 looming, Morales realized she had two options: pay her portion of the rent or spend that money on food and electricity. She chose food. But she wasn’t alone. Several of her neighbors also withheld their payments, initiating a rent strike that’s now lasted for months. Roughly 40 households at her building, as well as an adjacent one with the same owner, have joined in.

Their reasons for withholding rent vary. Many lost their jobs and can no longer afford to pay, even though their apartments are rent-stabilized. Some who are employed, have savings, or receive welfare want to show solidarity with their fellow tenants. Others were already waging a legal battle with the landlord before the pandemic hit, and see this moment as a chance to win better living conditions.

By striking, the tenants are also making an argument rooted in empathy. No one, they insist, should lose their home in the midst of a public health emergency."

Amid fears of eviction and not being able to pay for food, a group of Bronx tenants saw only one option: to go on rent strike.

10/12/2020
Redlining was outlawed in 1968. Here's how the practice is still hurting Black Americans.

"Despite the practice being illegal, Black loan applicants are still turned away by banks at a higher rate than White applicants. The widespread use of redlining has allowed generations of White Americans to build wealth through equity in homes and businesses, further widening a wealth gap African Americans have yet to rebound from.

Another person trying to reverse the trend is Chicago native and real estate developer Lamell McMorris, who is working to revitalize neighborhoods without completely gentrifying them or pricing out long-term residents — he calls the practice 'greenlining.'"

"I think you see it in every city in America," Atlanta councilman Amir Farokhi said. "This is where the basis of segregated neighborhoods remains to this day."

"As of September 28, the Mortgage Bankers Association reported that 6.87 percent of mortgage borrowers are in forbearanc...
10/09/2020
A Broader Outreach Strategy Would Help 400,000 Needlessly Delinquent Mortgage Borrowers

"As of September 28, the Mortgage Bankers Association reported that 6.87 percent of mortgage borrowers are in forbearance, including 4.46 percent of borrowers with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac mortgages and 9.15 percent of borrowers with Ginnie Mae mortgages. A quarter of those borrowers are using forbearance as an insurance policy and continue to make payments. But despite this widespread pickup of the forbearance option, approximately 400,000 homeowners who became delinquent after the pandemic began have forgone forbearance and become delinquent.

These borrowers may not know they are eligible for forbearance or do know but wrongly fear having to make 'double payments' when the forbearance period ends. To provide information and support to these borrowers, it is important to understand who they are."

Approximately 400,000 homeowners who became delinquent after the pandemic began have forgone forbearance and become delinquent.

"The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ordered a halt to evictions on Sept. 4 with one purpose in mind: protect...
10/09/2020
Matt Ampleman and Joel Ferber: Tenants must know their rights during eviction-suspension period

"The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ordered a halt to evictions on Sept. 4 with one purpose in mind: protecting public health. Newly evicted families are often forced into overcrowded homeless shelters or attempt to squeeze into friends’ or relatives’ homes. Still others live in cars or on the street. When sheriff deputies serve eviction writs, they come into contact with tenants and their families, some in large apartment buildings with dozens of people. Each of these situations increases exposure to and the spread of the coronavirus."

Tenants must know their rights as the government acts to protect public health. Landlords' eviction rights are limited during the pandemic.

"For far too long, Black people in America have not had fair and equitable access to financial services. It’s no surpris...
10/08/2020
The Color of Money: How Black Banks Build Black Economic Mobility

"For far too long, Black people in America have not had fair and equitable access to financial services. It’s no surprise that this lack of access has had a tremendous impact on the Black community’s ability to build wealth. While, there are many economic factors that have inhibited this wealth-building potential, among them, is the lack of Black-owned banks.

Enter the #BankBlack movement. While the hashtag took off several years ago, the idea of keeping the Black dollar in the Black community (and at Black financial institutions) has been around for generations."

For far too long, Black people in America have not had fair and equitable access to financial services. It’s no surprise that this lack of access has had a tremendous impact on the Black community’s ability to build wealth. While, there are many economic factors that have inhibited this wealth-b...

"The OCC order gives the regulator the right to veto any significant new acquisitions by the bank, and to require change...
10/08/2020
Citigroup fined $400 million by regulators, agrees to fix 'longstanding deficiencies'

"The OCC order gives the regulator the right to veto any significant new acquisitions by the bank, and to require changes to senior management or the bank’s board if necessary. It also requires Citi to create new senior teams devoted to addressing the issues, and for the board to provide frequent updates to regulators on how the comprehensive overhaul is progressing.

Regulators said Citi has for years failed to address concerns over its operational problems, with some issues dating back to 2013. In recent years, the OCC has slapped Citi with more than $70 million in fines for a range of lapses, including violating fair housing and flood insurance regulations and rules on how long banks can hold foreclosed property."

Citigroup Inc agreed to pay a $400 million penalty and draw up a sweeping remediation plan after U.S. regulators identified "several longstanding deficiencies" and operational lapses, U.S. regulators said on Wednesday.

"In addition to Citi’s business commitments, the Citi Foundation is making a new $5 million grant to Living Cities to pr...
10/07/2020
Citi pledges more than $1B to help close racial wealth gap: Action for Racial Equity commitments planned over next three years

"In addition to Citi’s business commitments, the Citi Foundation is making a new $5 million grant to Living Cities to provide U.S. mayors with access to technical expertise, training, and seed capital for pilot initiatives that address racial wealth and income gaps. The Citi Foundation also is expanding employability and entrepreneurship efforts serving Black youth as part of a new three-year $100 million investment in its successful Pathways to Progress initiative."

Citi and the Citi Foundation said they are committing more than $1 billion to help close the racial wealth gap and increase economic mobility in the United States.

"There have been some sources of help, though. Roughly $35,000 in local grants from regional groups like TechTown and In...
10/06/2020
The Paycheck Protection Program failed many Black-owned businesses

"There have been some sources of help, though. Roughly $35,000 in local grants from regional groups like TechTown and Invest Detroit have been major lifelines as Parker’s business has adapted. 'We went from not knowing if we were going to survive ... to pivoting pretty quickly,' Parker says.

Federal support, however, was more challenging to access.

Parker is one of millions of business owners who applied to the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) — a federal effort to boost small businesses established by the CARES Act — and she’s also among those who was denied support with little explanation why."

It built on inequities that already exist in banking.

"The two Cleveland houses paint a stark picture of how the pandemic—and the recovery from the economic crisis it precipi...
10/06/2020
Two Cleveland Houses Tell a Story of America’s Unequal Recovery

"The two Cleveland houses paint a stark picture of how the pandemic—and the recovery from the economic crisis it precipitated—are not only reinforcing but widening America’s inequalities. On the east side of town, in mostly Black neighborhoods with a high percentage of rental properties, tenants struggling with their rent are facing the prospect of eviction. On the west side, in wealthier and whiter neighborhoods filled with homeowners, housing prices are soaring.

The disparities are a legacy of decades of housing discrimination and the Great Migration of 6 million Black Americans from the South to then-thriving northern industrial cities. Cleveland, which went into the pandemic as the poorest of the 100 largest U.S. cities, is still reeling from the last financial crisis. It left a physical imprint in the vacant lots that turned some communities into checkerboards and a less visible one in the speculative churn that brought seven owners to the Clarebird house in a little more than two years."

An eviction notice on Clarebird Avenue and rising home prices on Daleview Drive reflect how the pandemic is reinforcing racial inequality.

"On June 3, a group of Rochester’s Black and Latino community leaders declared racism a public health crisis. They urged...
10/05/2020
COVID-19 Disparities in Rochester, NY: The Legacy of Redlining in the City of Frederick Douglass and Susan B. Anthony » NCRC

"On June 3, a group of Rochester’s Black and Latino community leaders declared racism a public health crisis. They urged communities of color to remain vigilant in fighting the spread of COVID-19.

The groups, La Cumbre and the Greater Rochester Black Agenda Group, linked the disparate impact of COVID-19 on Black and Brown communities to the fact that Black and Latinx people disproportionately suffer from various health conditions that are COVID-19 comorbidities. With the new report from NCRC and their academic partners, we know these comorbidities are a direct result of segregation in housing."

This includes the long legacy of structural racism in Rochester’s housing market. One early way structural racism raised its ugly head was through residential

"The report, 'Still Separate, Still Unequal: A Call to Level the Uneven Education Playing Field in St. Louis,' is the da...
10/02/2020
New Report Examines Deep Racial Inequities In St. Louis Region's Public Schools

"The report, 'Still Separate, Still Unequal: A Call to Level the Uneven Education Playing Field in St. Louis,' is the data counterpart to the nonprofit’s new website, which is meant to help advocates and individuals begin making more equitable changes to the city's education system. The data, highlighted on stillunequal.org, are sobering.

For starters, there is a roughly $2,000 difference in spending on individual students between majority Black and majority white school districts; teachers in Black districts make, on average, more than $6,000 less than their counterparts in white districts; property in Black neighborhoods is worth half that of white neighborhoods; and white households report a median income $30,000 greater than Black ones."

"Still Separate, Still Unequal" is a new report and digital tool on St. Louis' public schools. It was published Wednesday by Forward Through Fegurson, a nonprofit created to address the region's systemic racial challenges.

"A group of civil rights organizations in Michigan launched a class-action lawsuit against Vision Property Management, a...
10/02/2020
Predatory lending suit alleges Vision Property targeted Black buyers

"A group of civil rights organizations in Michigan launched a class-action lawsuit against Vision Property Management, a real estate investment administration firm with a history of predatory lending.

The group — comprised of the National Consumer Law Center, ACLU of Michigan, NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, and Michigan Poverty Law Program — alleged that the company had committed violations of the Fair Housing Act, Equal Credit Opportunity Act, Truth In Lending Act, Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act, Michigan Consumer Protection Act, Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act. The group also accused the firm of negligence, breach of contract, and breach of the duty of good faith and fair dealing."

The class-action lawsuit claims the company used deceptive contracts, locking low-income Black homebuyers into disadvantageous long-term mortgages without proper lending disclosures.

"Emmons has studied the last housing crisis, during the recession of 2007-2009, and he fears that the pain that's coming...
10/01/2020
Nicklaus: Housing crisis looms if Congress can't pass another relief bill

"Emmons has studied the last housing crisis, during the recession of 2007-2009, and he fears that the pain that's coming could be nearly as bad. 'The bottom line is that housing insecurity could be similar in magnitude to the Great Recession, even though this recession is quite different,' he said.

Krehmeyer fears that low-income neighborhoods would be devastated by another housing crisis so soon after the last one. 'Like the last go-round, it will have disproportionate effects on low-income communities and communities of color,' he said. 'Whatever hard-fought gains these communities have made since the last financial crisis, it's all going to come spiraling down again.'"

10.7 million Americans say they're behind on, or worried about, rent or mortgage payments

"In 2016, Carmen Arroyo’s 22-year-old son, Mikhail, regained consciousness from a six-month coma. He had been electrocut...
10/01/2020
Big Data Has Big Racism Problem

"In 2016, Carmen Arroyo’s 22-year-old son, Mikhail, regained consciousness from a six-month coma. He had been electrocuted while atop an electrical pole and had fallen nearly 30 feet, leaving him unable to walk, speak, or take care of himself. Arroyo, then 44, filed an application with her landlord requesting permission for her son to move into her apartment in Willimantic, Connecticut, with her. According to court records, the application was quickly denied without explanation, and Mikhail was sent to a rehabilitation facility, where he would remain for more than a year while his mother searched for a reason why."

For some, privacy infringement doesn’t just mean annoying ads; it could mean being denied a job or housing.

Address

1027 S Vandeventer Ave, Fl 6th
St. Louis, MO
63110

General information

Education on fair housing laws for housing providers (lenders, landlords, real estate agents and insurance agents), local governmental bodies (those who should be concerned about the affects of discrimination on their communities) and the general public (especially those who are most likely to experience illegal discrimination). Enforcement actions against those who we find, through our investigations, discriminate illegally. Community outreach, by participating in grass-roots and community-based projects; working with academics, civil rights leaders, and the housing industry; and spreading the word about our services and message through public service announcements, press releases, distribution of material, and the creation of this website.

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(314) 534-5800

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Hey all! My partner and I are starting an exciting chapter in St. Louis. We are bringing Stoic teachings and practices into areas of underprivileged youth (St. Louis and East St. Louis schools). The main purpose is violence prevention, conflict resolution, and school retention. Please consider donating to start up this cause. Money will go to buying texts by Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius, and Seneca.
Cloudia's Christmas For Our Homeless How you can help.... We are in desperate need of Candy as well as McDonald gift cards for our stockings! Sunday December 23rd at 3pm at the KC Hall on 157 in Collinsville, Illinois. We will be filling stockings and getting everything ready for our fourth annual... "Cloudia's Christmas For The Homeless" If anyone would like to come out and volunteer your time we welcome your help. We have over 300 stockings to fill. And this is a great time to make memories doing something wonderful with family and friends. If anyone would like to donate we are still in need of candy and McDonald's gift cards. It would be greatly appreciated and a huge blessing. Candy is a huge treat for our homeless. And everyone deserves a warm meal. If you would like to come out and help us serve Christmas day we are all meeting at the Mcdonalds Parking lot in downtown St.Louis on north Tucker we will be leaving the parking lot with Santa to go serve right at noon. Bring your families it's great for the heart
Aging With Grace Home Care is now servicing Franklin county. Anyone who needs assistance with house cleaning, shopping, errands, medication setup, and personal care call me for details. Covered 100% by Medicaid. Also, skilled services offered if necessary. Satellite office coming soon! Family members can get paid to care for loved ones as well under the CDS program. Competitive pay! Call the office at 314-270-9229 or call me directly for more information at 636-303-8288! Pass this along! Keep loved ones living independently longer!
this is a good organization, Kalila Jackson is awsome!
I am going to try and make the Open MIC for Open Doors.
It's Giving Thursday!! Please support this worth while non profit! We work hard so you don't have too to get you fair housing in St. Louis!