GFWC Pocono Mountain Women's Club

GFWC Pocono Mountain Women's Club GFWC Pocono Mountain Women's Club meets monthly on the fourth Monday of the month at 7 p.m. except for July and August. Email [email protected] for more info on our location or a Zoom invitation.

Unity In Diversity - Federated in 1972 GFWC Pennsylvania members include teachers, business owners, social workers, elected officials, medical professionals, homemakers, corporate executives, students, and retirees, representing six geographical districts, 27 counties, and 124 clubs with an approximate membership of 4260. Membership in general clubs is open to women 18 years of age and older.

Unity In Diversity - Federated in 1972 GFWC Pennsylvania members include teachers, business owners, social workers, elected officials, medical professionals, homemakers, corporate executives, students, and retirees, representing six geographical districts, 27 counties, and 124 clubs with an approximate membership of 4260. Membership in general clubs is open to women 18 years of age and older.

Operating as usual

Mark your Calendars! Free Child Safety Seat Inspections, Wednesday, September 22nd from 12pm to 9pm at Fern Ridge State ...
09/14/2021
Mark your Calendars! Free Child Safety Seat Inspections, Wednesday, September 22nd from 12pm to 9pm at Fern Ridge State Police Barracks – The West End Reporter

Mark your Calendars! Free Child Safety Seat Inspections, Wednesday, September 22nd from 12pm to 9pm at Fern Ridge State Police Barracks – The West End Reporter

Mark your Calendars! Free Child Safety Seat Inspections, Wednesday, September 22nd from 12pm to 9pm at Fern Ridge State Police Barracks by West End Reporter Staff · Published September 14, 2021 · Updated September 14, 2021 Post Views: 11

Photos from National Organization for Women (NOW)'s post
09/14/2021

Photos from National Organization for Women (NOW)'s post

Timeline Photos
09/14/2021

Timeline Photos

#OTD, Margaret Sanger (1879-1966) was born. An outspoken and life-long advocate for women’s reproductive rights, Sanger was a nurse who founded the birth control movement, her efforts leading to the birth control pill in 1960. Unfortunately, Sanger also advocated for inherently racist movements, including eugenics, which deepened racial injustice in the health care system which continues today (see: https://www.plannedparenthood.org/about-us/who-we-are/our-history). Planned Parenthood makes clear its opposition to racism and denounces Sanger’s belief in eugenics. After attending Claverack College and Hudson River Institute in 1896, she became a nurse after completing the nursing program at White Plains Hospital in 1902. In 1912, Sanger started a s*x education for women campaign, writing a newspaper column called "What Every Girl Should Know", leading Sanger to create a feminist publication, The Woman Rebel, where she advocated for birth control in 1914 and for which she was charged with violating the Comstock laws. Sanger fled to England, returning a year later to stand trial, but the charges were dropped, due to public pressure when her 5-year-old daughter died unexpectedly. In 1916, she opened the first birth control clinic in Brownsville, Brooklyn. Less than a week later, she was arrested and spent 30 days in jail, gaining media attention and supporters for her cause. She appealed her conviction and lost, but the courts ruled that doctors could prescribe contraceptives to women for medical reasons. This allowed Sanger to open her clinic in 1923, staffed by female doctors and social workers, later becoming the Planned Parenthood Federation of America. In 1917, Sanger launched the Birth Control Review and founded the American Birth Control League in 1921 to gain support from the public, social workers, and medical professionals for birth control. In 1929, she formed the National Committee on Federal Legislation for Birth Control to lobby Congress for legislation that would allow doctors to prescribe birth control. Court rulings from 1936 ultimately led to the 1970’s court rulings that enable both married and unmarried women to obtain birth control from their doctors. Sanger’s efforts led to the legalization and usage of contraceptives in the United States, but Sanger’s racist activities also caused great damage to people of color, which continues today.

09/14/2021

Fall Cleanup - October 1 & 2 (112 Township Drive, Tannersville).

09/14/2021

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney of New York paid tribute to the heroic women of the Women's Suffrage Movement at last night's Met Gala in a dress calling for 'equal rights for women'! The dress displayed the suffragists' campaign colors of purple, white, and gold and was accessorized with a purse urging the passage of the Equal Rights Amendment with the slogan "ERA YES." Before the gala, which is a fundraiser for the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute, Maloney shared a photo of herself on Twitter in the dress, pictured here, in front of the Women's Rights Pioneers Monument in Central Park. She wrote: "Across the country, women’s rights are under attack. I have long used fashion as a force 4 change. As the Met Costume Institute reopens w/ their inaugural exhibit celebrating American designers, I am calling 4 the certification of the ERA so women can be equal once and for all."

After women finally won the right to vote in the US in 1920 after a 72-year-long struggle, many of the suffragists who led the final push to pass the 19th Amendment quickly turned their attention to passing the Equal Rights Amendment, which would enshrine in the Constitution the principle that "women are people equal in stature before the law." The only right explicitly affirmed by the Constitution as equal for women and men is still the right to vote, as guaranteed by the 19th Amendment.

While the ERA, which was originally drafted by suffragist Alice Paul in 1923, was nearly added to the Constitution almost 50 years ago, it narrowly failed ratification and its passage remains a goal of women's rights advocates today. Among them was the former Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who when asked what amendment she would most like to see added to the Constitution, replied that she would choose "the Equal Rights Amendment," observing that when her granddaughters read the Constitution, she would like them to see "that that is a basic principle of our society."

To learn more about the heroic women of the Suffrage Movement, we've featured reading recommendations for both children and adults in our blog post "How Women Won The Vote” at https://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=11827

For an excellent new children's book about the final intense stage of the Suffrage Movement, we highly recommend "Alice Paul, Lucy Burns, and Their Big Idea" for ages 7 to 12 at https://www.amightygirl.com/how-women-won-the-vote

For two exceptional books for tweens and teens, we also recommend "Roses and Radicals" for ages 10 and up (https://www.amightygirl.com/roses-and-radicals) and "Votes for Women!" for ages 13 and up (https://www.amightygirl.com/votes-for-women)

For adult readers, we recommend the superb historical account "Suffrage: Women's Long Battle for the Vote" at https://www.amightygirl.com/suffrage-women-s-long-battle

And, for our favorite bit of fashion honoring women throughout history who fought for their rights, check out the "Well behaved women seldom make history" t-shirt -- available in a variety of styles and colors for all ages -- at https://www.amightygirl.com/well-behaved-women-history-shirt

Thought for today. #GFWC #GFWCPA #LivingtheVolunteerSpirit #Thoughtfortoday
09/14/2021

Thought for today. #GFWC #GFWCPA #LivingtheVolunteerSpirit #Thoughtfortoday

Thought for today. #GFWC #GFWCPA #LivingtheVolunteerSpirit #Thoughtfortoday

09/14/2021

Pennsylvania was founded based on tolerance.

🌸🌹🌼🌷🌺 ALL ARE WELCOME HERE 🌸🌹🌼🌷🌺

Sending a warm, special welcome to the Afghan evacuees who are now calling Pennsylvania home. We hope you find comfort and a fulfilling new life here in the Keystone State.

Timeline Photos
09/14/2021

Timeline Photos

'Our country was built by strong women, and we will continue to break down walls and defy stereotypes."- A powerful quote from Nancy Pelosi. Wherever you are leading in life, we celebrate you and your courage!

Timeline Photos
09/14/2021

Timeline Photos

Five weeks may seem far away, but don’t let the October 18 deadline for voter registration sneak up on you. Register today: vote.pa.gov/Register

Timeline Photos
09/13/2021

Timeline Photos

It’s National Disability Voter Registration Week. Register to vote today: vote.pa.gov/Register.

Visit www.vote.pa.gov/Voting-in-PA/Pages/Accessible-Voting.aspx to learn about the resources and options available to assist PA voters with disabilities. #DisabilityVote #REVUP

Timeline Photos
09/13/2021

Timeline Photos

Today in 1994, former President Clinton signed the Violence Against Women Act into law. This landmark piece of legislation finally recognized domestic violence and s*xual assault as crimes.

This essential legislation provided invaluable protections, but more can be done to protect those of all genders and ethnicities in the United States from domestic abuse and s*xual violence. We recognize the unique struggles and violence that women, LGBTQIA+, BIPOC, and persons with disabilities face, and therefore continue to fight for better protections.

09/13/2021

Pennsylvania is updating this congressional district map, and your feedback is critical.

That is why I took executive action today to create a council of redistricting experts to hear from you and provide guidance to assist my review once the legislature sends a map to my desk.

The new congressional district boundaries will affect every Pennsylvanian for the next decade. I'm committed to a fair and transparent redistricting process.

Gerrymandering is wrong. Politicians should not use the redistricting process to choose their own voters.

I want to hear from you. Submit your feedback and your own proposed voting district map: governor.pa.gov/redistricting-feedback.

Learn more about my executive order: https://on.pa.gov/3C6NQMb

Thought for today. #GFWC #GFWCPA #LivingtheVolunteerSpirit #Thoughtfortoday
09/13/2021

Thought for today. #GFWC #GFWCPA #LivingtheVolunteerSpirit #Thoughtfortoday

Thought for today. #GFWC #GFWCPA #LivingtheVolunteerSpirit #Thoughtfortoday

09/12/2021

Claire Marie Hodges, first female National Park ranger, 1918.

Claire Marie Hodges (1890-1970) became the first paid female park ranger in the National Park Service when she was hired to work as a seasonal naturalist at Yosemite National Park in 1918. She was hired due to male labor shortages caused by the First World War.

Hodges, a teacher at the local Yosemite Valley School, had lived in the Yosemite area since 1916, and regularly explored the area on horseback. When she applied for the job, she said she knew the area so well that she already had two years of pre-employment training.

When she approached Park Superintendent Washington B. Lewis for the job, she said, “Probably you’ll laugh at me, but I want to be a ranger.” Lewis didn’t laugh. According to Adventure-Journal.com, he said, “I beat you to it, young lady. It’s been on my mind for some time to put a woman on one of these patrols.”

Claire was issued a regulation Park Service hat and a badge, and wearing a split skirt, she patrolled the park on horseback, talking to visitors, and taking the park gate receipts to the headquarters. She had the same responsibilities as the male rangers at Yosemite. The other rangers told her she needed a gun for protection against animals and attackers, but she chose not to carry one.

Claire Hodges was a trailblazer, but she, and the superintendent who hired her, were way ahead of their time. It was not until the 1970s that female park rangers were hired on a regular basis, wearing the same uniforms and performing the same jobs as men.

Photo courtesy Yosemite National Park.

Denise Hight

Photos from Belmont-Paul Women's Equality National Monument's post
09/12/2021

Photos from Belmont-Paul Women's Equality National Monument's post

Timeline Photos
09/11/2021

Timeline Photos

GFWC remembers everyone who lost their lives today, 9/11.

09/11/2021

Today we remember the lives lost 20 years ago on September 11, 2001. We honor the true sacrifice made by the passengers and crew of Flight 93 that fateful day in the skies above Shanksville, PA.

Timeline Photos
09/11/2021

Timeline Photos

Today, let us pause to remember and honor the lives of those who were lost on September 11, 2001. #PatriotDay

09/11/2021

❤️Wake up. Sit. Breathe. Connect to your patience, strength, and beauty within.

❤️Every day when you get out of bed, walk your path as best you can for that day. Offer a helping hand wherever you are being called, and truly show up for your life. You are a hero.

❤️Appreciate you and all that you are. Be proud of yourself and your commitment to your life.

❤️We're proud to know you and be here every day with you.

❤️Barb & Michelle

(Find a reason to smile even if you are facing the [email protected])

Thought for today. #livingthevolunteerspirit #GFWC #GFWCPA #thoughtfortoday
09/10/2021

Thought for today. #livingthevolunteerspirit #GFWC #GFWCPA #thoughtfortoday

Thought for today. #livingthevolunteerspirit #GFWC #GFWCPA #thoughtfortoday

Food Resources for Pennsylvanians
09/09/2021
Food Resources for Pennsylvanians

Food Resources for Pennsylvanians

If you are in immediate need of assistance, PA 211 can help. Start by searching their online resource database or texting your zip code to 898-211 to message with a live resource specialist. You can also call 2-1-1 for live help, but please note that they are experiencing high call volumes and wait....

09/09/2021

#OTD in 1852 the third National Women’s Rights Convention was held in Syracuse, NY, only four years after the first Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, NY. Although Elizabeth Cady Stanton was not present at this convention, she did send in a letter full of resolutions that were to be voted on. Other organizers of the Seneca Falls convention were present including Lucretia Mott, who presided over this convention along with her sister, Martha C. Wright, who served as a secretary.

This would also be the first national convention that Susan B. Anthony would attend, which Stanton
asked her to. Along with Anthony was another first timer, Matilda Joslyn Gage. Gage would make
a speech on the unequal rights of pay stating, “Thousands of women are driven to a life of pollution, by the insufficiency of wages in those departments of labor which she is legitimately permitted to enter”. Additionally, Lucy Stone would attend the convention wearing “Bloomers”.

Though many issues were brought up including marriage rights, one issue was not passed which was to form a national party, instead they decided to keep with encouraging local groups by appointing a central committee, encouraging local and state conventions and work on local issues, and cooperating "throughout the nation and the world."

Later, Gage would join Anthony and Stanton with their work, and in 1869, the women would form a national party, the National Woman Suffrage Association.

Photo: City Hall, Syracuse, N.Y. (1904), LOC

09/09/2021

Congratulations all around—to clubs for making the 2020 Top 10 Projects list and everyone receiving an award at the 2021 GFWC Annual Convention! A special congrats goes to the Jennie Award Winners and The Washington Post’s Amy Brittain for being awarded the 2021 Croly Award for Excellence in Journalism Covering Issues of Concern to Women.

Read this week’s News & Notes for more information, which includes links to the Top Projects section of GFWC’s website, the 2021 Awards Page, and our 2021 Croly Award press release. www.gfwc.org/news-notes-september-9-2021

Photos from Belmont-Paul Women's Equality National Monument's post
09/09/2021

Photos from Belmont-Paul Women's Equality National Monument's post

Thought for today. #livingthevolunteerspirit #GFWC #GFWCPA #thoughtfortoday
09/09/2021

Thought for today. #livingthevolunteerspirit #GFWC #GFWCPA #thoughtfortoday

Thought for today. #livingthevolunteerspirit #GFWC #GFWCPA #thoughtfortoday

09/09/2021

Su***de Prevention Day is tomorrow. You can highlight the day by lighting a candle as an act of remembrance and support for su***de prevention. People from all over the world will light a candle near a window at 8pm on Friday, September 10.

Thought for today. #livingthevolunteerspirit #GFWC #GFWCPA #thoughtfortoday
09/08/2021

Thought for today. #livingthevolunteerspirit #GFWC #GFWCPA #thoughtfortoday

Thought for today. #livingthevolunteerspirit #GFWC #GFWCPA #thoughtfortoday

Thought for today. #livingthevolunteerspirit #GFWC #GFWCPA #thoughtfortoday
09/07/2021

Thought for today. #livingthevolunteerspirit #GFWC #GFWCPA #thoughtfortoday

Thought for today. #livingthevolunteerspirit #GFWC #GFWCPA #thoughtfortoday

Photos from The Garden of Giving's post
08/27/2021

Photos from The Garden of Giving's post

Thought for today. #GFWCPA #GFWC #thoughtoftheday #LivingTheVolunteerSpirit
08/27/2021

Thought for today. #GFWCPA #GFWC #thoughtoftheday #LivingTheVolunteerSpirit

Thought for today. #GFWCPA #GFWC #thoughtoftheday #LivingTheVolunteerSpirit

08/27/2021

Happy Women’s Equality Day! Thank a female role model, celebrate with friends and family (no matter your gender), and reflect on women’s history in the places where it happened. You can visit us in Seneca Falls, NY or at other National Park sites like Belmont-Paul Women's Equality National Monument (Washington, DC), First Ladies National Historic Site (Canton, OH), Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site (Richmond, VA), Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site (Washington, DC), and Rosie the Riveter WWII Home Front National Historical Park (Richmond, CA). Remember – stories of women standing up for equal rights are in every town, city, and community.
#FindYourPark #WomensRightsNPS #WomensEqualityDay #WomensHistory #NPS19th #Beyondthe19th #Suffrage

Timeline Photos
08/27/2021

Timeline Photos

Happy Women's Equality Day!

As we commemorate the adoption of the 19th Amendment, former LWV intern Nancy reflects on her contemporary heroes in the world of equality activism, from Gloria Anzaldúa to Kimberly Teehee.

https://bit.ly/3gAeQva

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Unlike many single-issue organizations, GFWC's structure allows us to address many needs of our local community. The Federation motto is Unity in Diversity and we have the option to work on our own community projects and/or to work together with other clubwomen on larger national and international projects. Members participate in various Community Programs such as Arts, Conservation, Education, International Outreach, Home Life, Public Issues and Legislation.

The GFWC Pocono Mountain Women’s Club was created and federated in 1972. We encourage local women 18 years of age and older to join us and make a difference in the lives of others. For More Information contact our Membership Chairwoman at [email protected]. Follow us on Twitter at @gfwcpmwc or visit www.gfwc.org for more information on our organization. PMWC PO Box 375 Pocono Pines PA 18350

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