The Historic Stoutsenberger Farmstead

The Historic Stoutsenberger Farmstead The story of the United States unfolds at the Historic Stoutsenberger Farmstead. Join us as we preserve, conserve, and educate about this place.

Congratulations to America's Routes for their Emmy award for their piece on Loudoun's gravel roads. This documentary eff...
07/06/2019
Campaign to Save Loudoun’s Rural Roads Wins Emmy for Documentary

Congratulations to America's Routes for their Emmy award for their piece on Loudoun's gravel roads. This documentary effectively shines a light on the value of unpaved roads to preserving the rural landscape. Take a look and share.
https://loudounnow.com/2019/07/02/campaign-to-save-loudouns-rural-roads-wins-emmy-for-documentary/

America’s Routes photographer Douglas Graham and ABC7/WJLA reporter Jay Korff won an Emmy for their documentary, “The Long Road Home,” about the America’s Routes project. The journalists teamed up on the 8-minute documentary, which captures the beauty and significance of Loudoun County’s u...

02/24/2019
The Long Road Home

https://youtu.be/XM3KHNgvux8 The historic landscapes around the Stoutsenberger Farmstead have long been part of its appeal. This news report does a good job addressing the challenges and opportunities in preserving these open spaces.

The future of clean air in the German Settlement seems to be at risk with Rockwool's plans for a factory in Ranson, WV. ...
09/14/2018
Loudouners, WV Locals Challenge Rockwool Plan

The future of clean air in the German Settlement seems to be at risk with Rockwool's plans for a factory in Ranson, WV. This piece from the Blue Ridge Leader gives a good overview. Please post other good information sources on the impact of this project. https://blueridgeleader.com/loudouners-wv-locals-challenge-rockwool-plan/

By Andrea Gaines Surrounded by a sudden and intense burst of negative publicity, residents in western Loudoun are now wondering: what will be the impact of the “stone wool” factory being built in R…

04/25/2018
This Place Matters

From the National Trust for Historic Preservation: May is Preservation Month, and we are ready to celebrate! Everyone has places that are important to them. Places they care about. Places that matter. This Place Matters is a national campaign that encourages people to celebrate the places that are meaningful to them and to their communities, and Preservation Month is the perfect time to share it with the world.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=103&v=7CDzqScfG5w

Every single person in the country has places that are important to them. Places they care about. Places that matter. We want to see and celebrate the places...

http://www.lovettsvillehistoricalsociety.org/index.php/lovettsville-historical-society-visits-threatened-aldie-landmark-...
02/13/2018
Lovettsville Historical Society Visits Threatened Aldie Landmark (2018) – Lovettsville Historical Society & Museum

http://www.lovettsvillehistoricalsociety.org/index.php/lovettsville-historical-society-visits-threatened-aldie-landmark-2018/

Lovettsville Historical Society Visits Threatened Aldie Landmark (2018) January 26, 2018 LHS_Admin Feature Article 0 by Rich Gillespie Sometimes organizations from opposite ends of the county put out a helping hand to each other. Such was the case on Saturday, January 20, 2018, when members of the L...

Here is a review of another museum that is providing fresh insights into our founding. The Museum of the American Revolu...
07/02/2017
Opinion | America’s shockingly violent birth

Here is a review of another museum that is providing fresh insights into our founding. The Museum of the American Revolution seems to understand the importance of educating the public about the complexity of the War for Independence. Not only did this shape the people who lived though these times, it should shape our understanding of today. I am adding a visit to the Museum of the American Revolution to my wish list. A penny for you thoughts if you have already been.

America’s shockingly violent birth
http://wapo.st/2sb5T0k

The deaths were about five times more per capita than America lost in World War II.

Food for thought for all those who love an old barn.
05/18/2017
Preservation Virginia

Food for thought for all those who love an old barn.

We love barns. In 2009 we listed tobacco barns to the Most Endangered Historic Places list. "Barns are as American as apple pie—emblematic of our agricultural heritage and rural character. But around the United States, many older and historic barns are deteriorating and disappearing, threatened by changing farming practices, urban sprawl, and the complexities in maintaining these unique structures."

Posting from Williamsburg, Virginia on Good Friday where understanding place and the human experience are front and cent...
04/14/2017
National Trust for Historic Preservation

Posting from Williamsburg, Virginia on Good Friday where understanding place and the human experience are front and center. Why do old places matter to you?

Continuity. Memory. Individual Identity. Civic, State, National, and Universal Identity. Beauty. History. Architecture. Sacred. Creativity. Learning. Sustainability. Ancestors. Community. Economics.

John G. Lewis did research on the history and architecture of the Stoutsenberger Farmstead in the early 1970s. This hist...
04/13/2017
Loudoun County Preservation and Conservation Coalition

John G. Lewis did research on the history and architecture of the Stoutsenberger Farmstead in the early 1970s. This historic bridge, just south of Taylorstown, is a fitting tribute.

Come see the proposed designs for rehabilitation of the historic bridge on Featherbed Lane north of Waterford on April 19.

One hundred years ago this week the United States entered World War One. One wonders how that news was greeted at the li...
04/08/2017
Lynching Of Robert Prager Underlined Anti-German Sentiment During World War I

One hundred years ago this week the United States entered World War One. One wonders how that news was greeted at the little farmstead outside of Taylorstown, Virginia. The German heritage of many of the residents of northern Loudoun County must have exposed them to increased scrutiny and suspicion.

This two-part series from NPR gives a window into the anti-German views and actions that descended upon the nation. A web search for information about anti-German sentiment in Loudoun came up empty. Readers, please share any information you have about how the Great War impacted the German Settlement.http://www.npr.org/2017/04/07/523044253/during-world-war-i-u-s-government-propaganda-erased-german-culture

It became dangerous to be German in the U.S. after the country entered World War I. But it was fatal for Robert Prager. The immigrant was lynched in the town of Collinsville, Ill. It's a story people in the St. Louis suburb didn't talk about for years, but today it's on display at a local museum.

01/15/2017

"...George Ritchie, the fiend who had accelerated the death of Union soldiers at Ball's Bluff by stomping upon them." Thus writes the Sacramento Bee on April 23, 1862. Ritchie was the owner of the Stoutsenberger Farmstead at the time and in big for the Confederacy. It is the only known reference of him in print.

War is hell. It is a simple truth. It is also a truth that is easy to forget. I am glad the Department of the Interior expanded to 3,300 acres the area of Balls Bluff Battlefield National Historic Landmark recently. The place where George Ritchie earned national notoriety will now have a larger stage to tell its story. Now is a good time for a visit. With a new administration taking office, the open landscape will remind you of the fiendish cost of war.
http://loudounnow.com/2017/01/12/interior-secretary-approves-massive-expansion-of-balls-bluff-battlefield-landmark/

As we start the new year, this piece provides an interesting overview of the challenges and opportunities for those who ...
12/31/2016
Amid urbanization, rural Loudoun County holds its own | LoudounTimes.com

As we start the new year, this piece provides an interesting overview of the challenges and opportunities for those who care about the historic landscape of western Loudoun County. Recently we were asked by students at Harmony MIddle School about some of the largest challenges faced by advocates of historic preservation. Our answer spoke to the need for balance between the rights of property and the needs of the community. What do you think the challenges and opportunities are? Where ever you come down, we are looking to working with you in 2017.
http://www.loudountimes.com/index.php/news/article/amid_urbanization_rural_loudoun_county_holds_its_own432

I’m not a developer, just a citizen who is tired of everyone, well at least the ones here, complaining about everything. You live in an area that is growing and will continue to grow, that is not news. My point is that people are always blaming developers instead of your neighbor who will gladly t...

Check out my latest blog post entitled "A pond and an access road. Is this an idea worth pursuing?" As always, I welcome...
08/20/2016
A pond and an access road. Is this an idea worth pursuing?

Check out my latest blog post entitled "A pond and an access road. Is this an idea worth pursuing?" As always, I welcome your feedback. http://wp.me/p5P0Sa-4E

The Stoutsenberger Farmstead is over 220 years old. Even under good conditions that would make it a challenge to keep it up. Truth be told, little maintenance has been done on the main structures f…

Before the heat of the day sets in, why not take to the freshly cut paths of the Historic Stoutsenberger Farmstead for a...
08/15/2016
New photo by Eirik Harteis

Before the heat of the day sets in, why not take to the freshly cut paths of the Historic Stoutsenberger Farmstead for a walk? You might see views like this...

Check out the new video blog I just posted on the Historic Stoutsenberger Farmstead blog site. This is something new for...
07/20/2016
Video on Shaw Memorial

Check out the new video blog I just posted on the Historic Stoutsenberger Farmstead blog site. This is something new for us and we welcome your feedback.

http://wp.me/p5P0Sa-4h

This post is coming to you from Boston, Massachusetts. I am here as part of a seminar with the National Endowment for the Humanities on the Philosophies of Education. One reason I applied to this s…

We are continuing our efforts to gather your insights about books that turn people on to exploring history. If you have ...
07/20/2016
Google Forms - create and analyze surveys, for free.

We are continuing our efforts to gather your insights about books that turn people on to exploring history.

If you have any ideas, feel free to share them at the link below. We hope to have compiled a list from your suggestions by the end of the summer. Spread the word.

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdasPchMVdWAjO408bxlY3qj3MAIfxVoZrL-hGfC1Aq1L3tzg/viewform

Create a new survey on your own or with others at the same time. Choose from a variety of survey types and analyze results in Google Forms. Free from Google.

Pressing questions seem to be at the heart of Black History Month 2016. Issues like community-police relations, campus d...
02/15/2016
Parents outraged after students shown ‘white guilt’ cartoon for Black History Month

Pressing questions seem to be at the heart of Black History Month 2016. Issues like community-police relations, campus diversity, the school-to-prison pipeline, and the Flint water crisis are getting increased media attention. One would think examining the historical roots of these and other issues during the month of February would be encouraged. Shouldn't Black History Month be a time to step out of our comfort zone and take a second look at parts of our story that don't make it to the top of the list at other times of the year? What connections can we make with our past to the challenges and opportunities we face in the present?

Unfortunately, there seems to be little of this. A school in Henrico County Virginia organized an assembly on history and structural discrimination. After some parents complained, local school board banned future use of a video that was part of the presentation. Examples like this illustrate why educators end up playing it safe and soft-selling Black History Month as if it has no connection to our present condition. In the current climate the month is at risk as of being as relevant as Presidents Day (Salute George Washington by buying a mattress half off).

The Historic Stoustenberger Farmstead sends a valentine to all those who take the risk to make our rich, beautiful, difficult, and powerful history meaningful and relevant in February and every month of the year. This challenge is at the core of what we are trying to do here. There is much work to be done. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/education/wp/2016/02/11/parents-outraged-after-students-shown-white-guilt-cartoon-for-black-history-month/

"Structural Discrimination: The Unequal Opportunity Race" was shown as part of Glen Allen High School's Black History Month program.

It was interesting to see how quickly and how many (7 for, 0 against) members of the Loudoun Board of Supervisors commit...
09/07/2015
Loudoun Supervisors Approve Funding For Slave Memorial

It was interesting to see how quickly and how many (7 for, 0 against) members of the Loudoun Board of Supervisors committed $50,000 to a slave memorial on the grounds of the Loudoun courthouse. As noted by Supervisor Higgins, Loudoun was a slave holding county. At the Stoutsenberger Farmstead, for many years there were more enslaved people than free. I hope this move takes us closer to telling their story more effectively. http://www.leesburgtoday.com/news/loudoun-supervisors-approve-funding-for-slave-memorial/article_e2cdbdfe-523b-11e5-83fa-9b16b6af2284.html

The statue of a Confederate soldier at the Loudoun County courthouse could be getting some company in the future, which probably pleases Pastor Michelle Thomas.

As the housing economy picks up again in western Loudoun county, we are going to hear questions about the value of parks...
07/18/2015
We’re finally starting to realize what nature is really worth

As the housing economy picks up again in western Loudoun county, we are going to hear questions about the value of parks, green space, and agriculture. I was glad to see today's article in the Washington Post address the idea of economic value of preserving nature. If adding eleven trees to a city block increases income by $20,000 or adds 1.4 years of life (as the article reports), I wonder what numbers we could put on a place like the Historic Stoutsenberger Farmstead. Conversely, I wonder what the negative impact of development will be in the coming years. Parks, green spaces, and agriculture will need our voices in this coming debate.

The staggeringly large benefits of conserving nature.

If you missed this article in the Washington Post about the connection between green space and learning, check it out. P...
06/22/2015
Why green spaces are good for your kid’s brain

If you missed this article in the Washington Post about the connection between green space and learning, check it out. Part of the mission of the Historic Stoutsenberger Farmstead is to preserve the landscape of this site. The study examined in the article seems to support our mission. http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2015/06/15/why-green-spaces-are-good-for-your-kids-brain/

Schools with more greenery improve kids' brain development, study finds.

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Lovettsville, VA
20180

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Saturday 1pm - 4pm
Sunday 1pm - 4pm

Telephone

(571) 309-9865

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