Loudoun Chapter 170 - United Daughters of the Confederacy

Loudoun Chapter 170 - United Daughters of the Confederacy This page is for updating chapter events and information for Loudoun Chapter 170 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. Prospective members can contact the Chapter at [email protected] for further information.

Leesburg Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. Those eligible for membership are women of at least 16 years of age who are lineal or collateral blood descendants of men and women who served honorably in the Army, Navy, or Civil Service of the Confederate States of America, or gave Material Aid to the Cause.

Operating as usual

The Battle of Pine Bluff (also known as the Action at Pine Bluff) was a battle of the War Between the States. The battle...
10/25/2021

The Battle of Pine Bluff (also known as the Action at Pine Bluff) was a battle of the War Between the States. The battle was fought on October 25, 1863, in Jefferson County, Arkansas, near the county courthouse, where the U.S. garrison under the command of Col. Powell Clayton successfully defended the town against attacks led by Confederate General John S. Marmaduke. The Union victory ensured the safety of the garrison until the end of the war.

The Battle of Pine Bluff (also known as the Action at Pine Bluff) was a battle of the War Between the States. The battle was fought on October 25, 1863, in Jefferson County, Arkansas, near the county courthouse, where the U.S. garrison under the command of Col. Powell Clayton successfully defended the town against attacks led by Confederate General John S. Marmaduke. The Union victory ensured the safety of the garrison until the end of the war.

Carl Pfeffer was born in Buntzow, Mecklenburg (Germany) in June 1838. Carl immigrated to Galveston, TX with his parents ...
10/25/2021

Carl Pfeffer was born in Buntzow, Mecklenburg (Germany) in June 1838. Carl immigrated to Galveston, TX with his parents and five siblings in 1851. The family settled in Austin County, TX. He served with Waul's Legion in Mississippi. Following his capture at Yazoo City, MS, he was sent north to Camp Morton near Indianapolis, IN. In March 1864, he was transferred to Fort Delaware. Following the war, he married Pauline Ueckert and had twelve children. Carl was a farmer and operated a blacksmith shop.

Carl Pfeffer was born in Buntzow, Mecklenburg (Germany) in June 1838. Carl immigrated to Galveston, TX with his parents and five siblings in 1851. The family settled in Austin County, TX. He served with Waul's Legion in Mississippi. Following his capture at Yazoo City, MS, he was sent north to Camp Morton near Indianapolis, IN. In March 1864, he was transferred to Fort Delaware. Following the war, he married Pauline Ueckert and had twelve children. Carl was a farmer and operated a blacksmith shop.

Happy Birthday Brig. General Zachariah Cantey Deas, born on this day, 25 October 1819 in Camden, SC.
10/25/2021

Happy Birthday Brig. General Zachariah Cantey Deas, born on this day, 25 October 1819 in Camden, SC.

Happy Birthday Brig. General Zachariah Cantey Deas, born on this day, 25 October 1819 in Camden, SC.

John Karner was born in 1817 in Bavaria, the disputed territory then under the domain of France, and now a part of Germa...
10/24/2021

John Karner was born in 1817 in Bavaria, the disputed territory then under the domain of France, and now a part of Germany. About 1837 his father and the rest of the family came to this country, settling in Buffalo, New York. Seeking an adventure,
John went to Texas in the spring of 1835, reaching San Augustine County early in May. He lived there during that summer and the following fall joined Captain Henry Teel's company, Millot's battalion, then forming for the defense of Texas against the
Mexican invasion under Santa Ana. The company was in all the subsequent operations under Houston until after the battle of San Jacinto. After the surrender of the Mexican army, John returned with a number to Houston, where he was employed by a Mr. Allen, at whose house General Houston boarded.

In the spring of 1862, Mr. Karner entered the Confederate army, enlisting
in the Seventh Texas and serving twelve months on the coast. He then returned
home. Toward the close of the war, when Banks landed on Texas soil, Karner again entered the Confederate army and he served until the end of the war.

John Karner was born in 1817 in Bavaria, the disputed territory then under the domain of France, and now a part of Germany. About 1837 his father and the rest of the family came to this country, settling in Buffalo, New York. Seeking an adventure,
John went to Texas in the spring of 1835, reaching San Augustine County early in May. He lived there during that summer and the following fall joined Captain Henry Teel's company, Millot's battalion, then forming for the defense of Texas against the
Mexican invasion under Santa Ana. The company was in all the subsequent operations under Houston until after the battle of San Jacinto. After the surrender of the Mexican army, John returned with a number to Houston, where he was employed by a Mr. Allen, at whose house General Houston boarded.

In the spring of 1862, Mr. Karner entered the Confederate army, enlisting
in the Seventh Texas and serving twelve months on the coast. He then returned
home. Toward the close of the war, when Banks landed on Texas soil, Karner again entered the Confederate army and he served until the end of the war.

The Battle of Westport, sometimes referred to as the "Gettysburg of the West," was fought on October 23, 1864, in modern...
10/23/2021

The Battle of Westport, sometimes referred to as the "Gettysburg of the West," was fought on October 23, 1864, in modern Kansas City, Missouri, during the War Between the States. Union forces under General Samuel R. Curtis defeated an outnumbered Confederate force under General Sterling Price. This engagement was the turning point of Price's Missouri Expedition, forcing his army to retreat. The battle ended the last major Confederate offensive west of the Mississippi River, and for the remainder of the war the United States Army maintained solid control over most of Missouri. This battle was one of the largest to be fought west of the Mississippi River, with over 30,000 men engaged.

The Battle of Westport, sometimes referred to as the "Gettysburg of the West," was fought on October 23, 1864, in modern Kansas City, Missouri, during the War Between the States. Union forces under General Samuel R. Curtis defeated an outnumbered Confederate force under General Sterling Price. This engagement was the turning point of Price's Missouri Expedition, forcing his army to retreat. The battle ended the last major Confederate offensive west of the Mississippi River, and for the remainder of the war the United States Army maintained solid control over most of Missouri. This battle was one of the largest to be fought west of the Mississippi River, with over 30,000 men engaged.

When the state of Mississippi seceded from the Union in January 1861, a flag bearing a single white star on a blue field...
10/23/2021

When the state of Mississippi seceded from the Union in January 1861, a flag bearing a single white star on a blue field was flown from the capitol dome. Harry Macarthy helped popularize this flag as a symbol of independence, writing the popular song "The Bonnie Blue Flag" early in 1861. He first performed the song at the Spengler Theatre in Jackson, MS on January 10, 1861. One story indicates that he was aided in his song writing by a ex court musician from Hanover, Germany, Jacob Tannenbaum. They teamed up in Mobile, Alabama, and co-wrote the song.

When the state of Mississippi seceded from the Union in January 1861, a flag bearing a single white star on a blue field was flown from the capitol dome. Harry Macarthy helped popularize this flag as a symbol of independence, writing the popular song "The Bonnie Blue Flag" early in 1861. He first performed the song at the Spengler Theatre in Jackson, MS on January 10, 1861. One story indicates that he was aided in his song writing by a ex court musician from Hanover, Germany, Jacob Tannenbaum. They teamed up in Mobile, Alabama, and co-wrote the song.

Happy Birthday Brig. General Turner Ashby, born on this day, 23 October 1828 in Fauquier Co., VA.
10/23/2021

Happy Birthday Brig. General Turner Ashby, born on this day, 23 October 1828 in Fauquier Co., VA.

Happy Birthday Brig. General Turner Ashby, born on this day, 23 October 1828 in Fauquier Co., VA.

Photos from Spotsylvania Memory's post
10/22/2021

Photos from Spotsylvania Memory's post

Henry Christian Brandt was born in 1838. He arrived in Texas from Germany in 1856 with his father and two brothers. Afte...
10/22/2021

Henry Christian Brandt was born in 1838. He arrived in Texas from Germany in 1856 with his father and two brothers. After a brief stay with his uncle in Industry, TX, Brandt moved to Chappell Hill. In those years, the town was a thriving commercial hub, the center of wealth and education. Being a trained cabinetmaker, he opened a shop as a carpenter and builder. In 1860, he bought a house in Chappell Hill which is known as the C. Brandt Museum today. That same year, he married Laura Jane Burns.

In 1862, Brandt joined the Confederate army. He enlisted in Waul's Texas Legion and served in Mississippi until July 14, 1863, when his company was taken prisoner by the Union. He spent the remainder of the war at Camp Morton near Indianapolis, IN.

Following the war, Brandt returned to Chappell Hill and ran his ship until he retired in 1897. When the Hurricane of 1900 hit Galveston, the Chappell Hill United Methodist Church was destroyed. Brandt supervised the construction of the new building. The structure is still a place of worship for the Methodist congregation today.

Henry Christian Brandt was born in 1838. He arrived in Texas from Germany in 1856 with his father and two brothers. After a brief stay with his uncle in Industry, TX, Brandt moved to Chappell Hill. In those years, the town was a thriving commercial hub, the center of wealth and education. Being a trained cabinetmaker, he opened a shop as a carpenter and builder. In 1860, he bought a house in Chappell Hill which is known as the C. Brandt Museum today. That same year, he married Laura Jane Burns.

In 1862, Brandt joined the Confederate army. He enlisted in Waul's Texas Legion and served in Mississippi until July 14, 1863, when his company was taken prisoner by the Union. He spent the remainder of the war at Camp Morton near Indianapolis, IN.

Following the war, Brandt returned to Chappell Hill and ran his ship until he retired in 1897. When the Hurricane of 1900 hit Galveston, the Chappell Hill United Methodist Church was destroyed. Brandt supervised the construction of the new building. The structure is still a place of worship for the Methodist congregation today.

10/21/2021

This Week in History: Civil War Farewell, 1862
An officer says goodbye to his wife, while his fellow cavalrymen check their accoutrements, saddles, and weapons in the preparation for their departure. This scene must have been repeated countless times during the war.
"The Palace Bar" by Mort Kunstler
Learn more / Buy this print: https://bit.ly/3jr8WOp
Visit mkunstler.com or call 800-850-1776

10/21/2021

State historical marker of the day: F-1 in Loudoun County, along Leesburg Bypass / US 15:
Battle of Ball's Bluff
Just to the east, 1,700 Union troops crossed the Potomac River and clashed with 1,700 Confederates on 21 Oct. 1861. The previous evening, a Union reconnaissance patrol had mistaken a row of trees for Confederate tents. Brig. Gen. Charles Stone ordered an early-morning raid on this “camp.” Confederates under Col. Nathan Evans confronted the Federals, who were then reinforced. Col. and Sen. Edward D. Baker took command and became the only sitting U.S. senator ever killed in combat. The Federals retreated across the river in disarray. Congress created the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War to investigate the defeat.

Department of Historic Resources, 2015
Photo shows Sen. Edward D. Baker in 1861 (Wikipedia).

10/21/2021

Many of you will recognize the man in this photograph, but my guess is not many will know where the picture was taken.

This man relaxing on the bench is former Confederate president, Jefferson Davis. This photograph was taken in Glasgow, Scotland on August 11, 1869.

If you are like me, you are probably thinking: Glasgow? What the heck was Davis doing in Glasgow?

In 1867, Davis was released from his confinement at Fort Monroe on $100,000 bail. He soon departed for Canada and lived with his family in Lennoxville, Quebec until 1868. A pariah in his home country, Davis sought work in Cuba and Europe. For a time he stayed as a guest in the home of Glasgow foundry owner, James Smith. During the Civil War, Smith became friends with Davis while he visited several southern states to promote his foundry business.

Tomorrow I will post a few more rarely seen images related to Jefferson Davis, and then I will get back to more local history.

The Battle of Ball's Bluff in Loudoun County, Virginia on October 21, 1861, was one of the early battles of the War Betw...
10/21/2021

The Battle of Ball's Bluff in Loudoun County, Virginia on October 21, 1861, was one of the early battles of the War Between the States, in which Union Army forces under Major General George B. McClellan suffered a humiliating defeat.

The operation was planned as a minor reconnaissance across the Potomac to establish whether the Confederates were occupying the strategically important position of Leesburg. A false report of an unguarded Confederate camp encouraged General Charles Pomeroy Stone to order a raid, which resulted in a clash with enemy forces. A prominent U.S. Senator in uniform, Colonel Edward Baker, tried to reinforce the Union troops, but failed to ensure that there were enough boats for the river crossings. Baker was killed, and a newly-arrived Confederate unit routed the rest of Stone’s expedition.

The Union losses, although modest by later standards, alarmed Congress, which set-up the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, a body which would provoke years of bitter political infighting.

The Battle of Ball's Bluff in Loudoun County, Virginia on October 21, 1861, was one of the early battles of the War Between the States, in which Union Army forces under Major General George B. McClellan suffered a humiliating defeat.

The operation was planned as a minor reconnaissance across the Potomac to establish whether the Confederates were occupying the strategically important position of Leesburg. A false report of an unguarded Confederate camp encouraged General Charles Pomeroy Stone to order a raid, which resulted in a clash with enemy forces. A prominent U.S. Senator in uniform, Colonel Edward Baker, tried to reinforce the Union troops, but failed to ensure that there were enough boats for the river crossings. Baker was killed, and a newly-arrived Confederate unit routed the rest of Stone’s expedition.

The Union losses, although modest by later standards, alarmed Congress, which set-up the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, a body which would provoke years of bitter political infighting.

From the Washington Gazette, October 30, 1890"William, Baron of Eberstein, and old and most highly esteemed friend of Th...
10/21/2021

From the Washington Gazette, October 30, 1890

"William, Baron of Eberstein, and old and most highly esteemed friend of The Gazette departed this life at his country residence, four miles from Washington, on Saturday, October 25th, 1890 in his 69 year. A true type of the ruddy faced German, a Baron in his own right, and withal a genial and sociable companion, William H. von Eberstein was always greeted by a host of friends no matter where he went. Leaving his native land on account of political persecution, his footsteps led him to Washington at an early age and the past forty years of his life have been spent among the people of Beaufort County. He espoused the cause of the Southern Confederacy, and entered his own body as a bulwark against the invasion of the land which he had adopted as his own, and his war record as a soldier is beyond reproach. When peace came again he quietly turned to his chosen profession – a tiller of the soil – and has since been thoroughly identified with all measures for promoting the agricultural welfare of his section. The ex-Confederates of North Carolina and their Association never had warmer nor better advocate than Mr. Eberstein, and he was ever foremost in any movement for their benefit. The Baron was master of several languages and was supplied with a fund of wit and humor which caused him to be much sought after in social circles. His funeral on Sunday at Trinity church was attended by a large number of sorrowing friends from all parts of the county. Peace to his ashes."

From the Washington Gazette, October 30, 1890

"William, Baron of Eberstein, and old and most highly esteemed friend of The Gazette departed this life at his country residence, four miles from Washington, on Saturday, October 25th, 1890 in his 69 year. A true type of the ruddy faced German, a Baron in his own right, and withal a genial and sociable companion, William H. von Eberstein was always greeted by a host of friends no matter where he went. Leaving his native land on account of political persecution, his footsteps led him to Washington at an early age and the past forty years of his life have been spent among the people of Beaufort County. He espoused the cause of the Southern Confederacy, and entered his own body as a bulwark against the invasion of the land which he had adopted as his own, and his war record as a soldier is beyond reproach. When peace came again he quietly turned to his chosen profession – a tiller of the soil – and has since been thoroughly identified with all measures for promoting the agricultural welfare of his section. The ex-Confederates of North Carolina and their Association never had warmer nor better advocate than Mr. Eberstein, and he was ever foremost in any movement for their benefit. The Baron was master of several languages and was supplied with a fund of wit and humor which caused him to be much sought after in social circles. His funeral on Sunday at Trinity church was attended by a large number of sorrowing friends from all parts of the county. Peace to his ashes."

10/20/2021

Rarely seen cabinet card of the Robert E. Lee monument shortly before its unveiling in Richmond on May 29, 1890. From the photo collection of the Confederate Memorial Literary Society.

Photos from NOVA History Remembered's post
10/20/2021

Photos from NOVA History Remembered's post

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Please help us in Wilmington, NC. Our monuments are under serious threat. We have been having protests nightly for over a week. Our city has given permits for the protests to continue nightly for a year. They have a petition circulating with 5000 signatures. There is a community review board working with the city to remove the monuments. Please sign our petition and forward to everyone you know. We need your help.
Look what the criminals are doing now...inciting arson. "Put it in a museum where it belongs!" Well, they already set fire to our beautiful museum--the UDC Memorial Building in Richmond. So much destruction! So many precious artifacts and records lost! Now they are inciting further arson and using it for a fundraiser too! Where the heck is law enforcement? Where the heck is the judicial system? Oh! Lying face down in the street...while the country burns.
R.I.P. Hero
❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️
The Descendants of the Confederate Officers Corps (“The Corp”) is open to any member of the Florida Division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, members of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and members of the Order of the Confederate Rose who is either a lineal or collateral descendant of a Confederate Officer who served honorably during any portion of the War Between the State from 1861 through 1865. This will include associate members who are members of other Camps or Chapter outside the State of Florida who maintain an associate membership with a Florida Division Camp or Chapter. Membership is a $50 one-time donation. If you are interested in this fraternal sub-organization of the SCV in Florida, please contact me directly at [email protected]
Thanks for sharing and the recognition
Good job! I’m from the very heart of Dixie!
Hi Y'all I am new to Facebook and I would love friends like you! I am a proud descendent of Commander Robert Edward Lee.
Members of the Turner Ashby Camp and the Clinton Hatcher Camp invite you to attend a Southern Cross of Honor Dedication November 4th 2018. Three Crosses will be dedicated for Ludwell Lee, who served in Company A 39th Virginia Cavalry Battalion (Lee’s Bodyguards); James William Lee, Company A 35th Virginia Cavalry Battalion (Whites Comanche’s); and William Franklin Kerfoot, Company B 8th Virginia Infantry. The ceremony will start at 2:00 pm and will be held at Ivy Hill Cemetery in Upperville, Virginia. If you have any questions about attending this ceremony contact myself Jason Lloyd, either through Facebook or my email address. You can also contact both camp Commanders and Adjutants of each camp Todd Kern of the Turner Ashby Camp or Adjutant Joseph Walkup. Also, Commander James Diehl of Clinton Hatcher Camp or Adjutant Ben Trittipoe for further information. Hope to see you there to honor these Southern Soldiers LEST WE FORGET Contact Information Jason Lloyd [email protected] Commander Todd Kern [email protected] Adjutant Joseph Walkup [email protected] Commander James Diehl [email protected] Adjutant Ben Trittipoe [email protected] “Up, Men, and to your posts! Don't forget today that you are from Old Virginia."