Loudoun Chapter 170 - United Daughters of the Confederacy

Loudoun Chapter 170 - United Daughters of the Confederacy This page is for updating chapter events and information for Loudoun Chapter 170 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. Prospective members can contact the Chapter at [email protected] for further information.

Leesburg Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. Those eligible for membership are women of at least 16 years of age who are lineal or collateral blood descendants of men and women who served honorably in the Army, Navy, or Civil Service of the Confederate States of America, or gave Material Aid to the Cause.

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Obituary of May 29, 1868"Col. Robert McMillan was born on 7th January 1805 near the city of Belfast, Ireland, and died i...
03/19/2021

Obituary of May 29, 1868
"Col. Robert McMillan was born on 7th January 1805 near the city of Belfast, Ireland, and died in Clarksville, Ga., on 6th May 1868. From the son of the deceased I learn that he came to America about the year 1832, and engaged in mercantile pursuits in Augusta, Ga. In 1836 he was married to Miss Ruth A. Banks, of Elbert co., where he settled and continue his mercantile pursuits until 1839, when he abandoned this for the profession of the law and legislator." F. G. Hughes"

He put his heart, soul, and money into the Confederate cause and raised and commanded the 24th Georgia Regiment. Although nearly sixty years old he was noted for his bravery. When General Thomas R. R. Cobb fell, mortally wounded at Fredricksburg, Col. McMillan was placed in temporary command and would have been made Brigadier-General but his health failed and he came home to die."

On March 19, 1861, Captain Trevanion T. Teel, leader of 18 Confederate troops, accepted the surrender of Fort Clark, Tex...
03/19/2021

On March 19, 1861, Captain Trevanion T. Teel, leader of 18 Confederate troops, accepted the surrender of Fort Clark, Texas from U S Army Captain George Sykes, who was garrisoned there with four companies. The surrender took place without military engagement, but not without tension. The Union soldiers garrisoned at the base cut the halliard of the flag-pole after the Federal flag was removed in order to prevent the Confederate flag being raised. They then set fire to the barracks as they were withdrawing. Sykes took quick action to extinguish the fire, preserving the barracks and nearby buildings. In June 1861, after the outbreak of the War Between the States, Fort Clark was garrisoned by companies C and H, Second Regiment of Texas Mounted Rifles, with Capt. H. A. Hamner as post commander. In August 1862, all Confederate troops were withdrawn from Fort Clark.

On December 12, 1866, U.S. troops from Company C of the Fourth Cavalry once again occupied the fort under the command of Capt. John E. Wilcox.

Emma Sansom was born on June 2, 1847, near Social Circle, Georgia, to Micajah and Levina Vann Sansom, a niece of Cheroke...
03/19/2021

Emma Sansom was born on June 2, 1847, near Social Circle, Georgia, to Micajah and Levina Vann Sansom, a niece of Cherokee leader James Vann. Around 1852, she and her family moved to a farm just outside Gadsden, Alabama. Her father died in 1858, by which time there were twelve children in her family.

In April 1863, Confederate Brig. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest was ordered into northern Alabama to pursue Union Colonel Abel Streight, who had orders to cut off the Confederate railroad near Chattanooga, Tennessee. On May 2, 1863, Streight arrived just outside Gadsden and prepared to cross Black Creek. Because the creek was swollen due to rain, Streight realized that if he destroyed the bridge he could get a few hours respite from the pursuit of Forrest. Seeing the nearby Sansom farmhouse, he rode upon it and demanded some smoldering coal, which he could use to burn the bridge. When Forrest's men arrived at the site, they found the burned out bridge and came under fire from Streight's men.

Forrest rode to the Sansom house and asked whether there was another bridge across the creek. Emma Sansom, then 16 years old, told him that the nearest bridge was in Gadsden, 2 miles away. Forrest then asked if there was a place where he could get across the creek. Emma told him that if one of his men would help saddle her horse, she would show him a place that she had seen cows cross the creek, and that he might be able to cross there. He replied that there was no time to saddle a horse and asked her to get on his horse behind him. As they started to leave, Emma's mother objected, but relented when Forrest assured her that he would bring the girl back safely. Emma then directed Forrest to the spot where he could cross the river. Some accounts of the skirmish indicate that the two came under fire from Union soldiers, who subsequently ceased fire when they realized that they had been firing on a teenage girl. After taking Emma back to her home, Forrest continued his pursuit of Streight, whom he was able to capture near Cedar Bluff on the following day.

Emma's actions are noteworthy in that openly aiding Confederate forces could have subjected her and her family to prosecution (or even death) from the Union Army.

Sansom married Christopher B. Johnson on October 29, 1864, and moved to Texas in late 1876 or early 1877. She died August 9, 1900 in Upshur County, Texas, and is buried in Little Mound Cemetery.

The actual crossing site was approximately 75 yards north of the point where modern Tuscaloosa Avenue crosses Black Creek in Gadsden.

Happy Birthday Brig General Johnson Kelly Duncan, born on this day March 19, 1827 in York, PA.
03/19/2021

Happy Birthday Brig General Johnson Kelly Duncan, born on this day March 19, 1827 in York, PA.

The Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy is a Roman Catholic religious institute founded by Bishop John England of th...
03/18/2021

The Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy is a Roman Catholic religious institute founded by Bishop John England of the Diocese of Charleston in South Carolina, in 1829 as the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy. After their founding in 1829, the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy began their ministry of caring for the sick in 1834. The next year the Sisters helped with a yellow fever epidemic in Charleston. In 1839, they went to Augusta, Georgia, to assist in combating an epidemic which was then raging in that city. Again in 1852, the Sisters worked with the sick during a return outbreak of yellow fever in Charleston.

During the War Between the States, Sisters from the Charleston Community served in Virginia nursing wounded soldiers. Those who remained in Charleston nursed the wounded and sick soldiers and, in addition, acted as “angels of mercy” to Union soldiers in prison. In addition, the nuns sent religious articles to Irish soldiers to remind them of their faith. They supervised the creation of Irish company flags and instilled in the young the values of being Catholic Confederates, reinforcing that the Confederate cause was a righteous one.

Having attended the sick and poor in dirty, crowded, and poorly ventilated rooms, prisons, and makeshift hospitals, the Sisters felt the need of a building of their own in which they could care not only for the physical ills of the patients but the spiritual afflictions as well. Financial resources were practiclly non-existent. However, Miss Maria McHugh of Charleston in 1880, gave a large lot with “buildings thereon” to the Sisters to be used as an industrial school for orphans. The donation from Miss McHugh was the impetus needed to begin a charitable institution. Sister Xavier Dunn, feeling that the orphans received sufficient industrial instruction with existing facilities, requested that Miss McHugh sell the property and give the proceeds for the establishment of a hospital under the direct care of the Sisters. Miss McHugh agreed to Sister Xavier’s plans.

As a tribute to Sister Xavier Dunn’s untiring work with the sick and ailing of the City of Charleston, the new Infirmary was named in honor of her patron Saint Francis Xavier. To the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy was accorded the privilege of establishing the first hospital under Catholic auspices in the State of South Carolina.

Mary Jackson Overall (1844-1929) was a spy in Middle Tennessee. As a sleuth for the Confederate Army, she had close ties...
03/18/2021

Mary Jackson Overall (1844-1929) was a spy in Middle Tennessee. As a sleuth for the Confederate Army, she had close ties to Rutherford County scouts throughout the war; and she maintained a strong presence in Smyrna.

She was born in Williamson County and was the daughter of Jackson and Mira Jordan Overall, who wed in in 1842. Upon her father’s death three years later, her mother married cousin John Jordan in 1853.

Mary toiled within an elite group of secret service agents, including Dee Jobe and Sam Davis of Smyrna, who operated out of Flat Rock near Nolensville. She was known for her beauty and ability to enchant Federal officers, in exchange for highly valuable information. Mary often teased and flirted with great charm, yet she was unrestrained in her mission. At a dance party, she would ably collect vital information from Union soldiers for the Confederates.

At 19 years old, Mary was an enthusiastic and resourceful young woman in Triune. During the War Between the States, she resided with her mother and sister Sophia Overall at the home of Dr. Clement Jordan. She spied in a special intelligence circle under John Hunt Morgan, her Uncle Ned and her future husband, John W. Headley. One of the more prominent assignments was to secure a complete map of Fort Negley in Nashville. With a daring carriage ride around Nashville, Mary made entrance into the fort and gathered major defensive information on Union strongholds, resulting in a vital report sent to Gen. Morgan. Mary returned with so much information that Capt. Headley declared, “I can guide the Rebels into the city on one hand and out on the other.”

Mary spied for over two years while signing her name as “Mollie.” She was once intercepted by the Federals and arrested in Triune under orders of Gen. George Thomas. Mary admitted that she was a Confederate spy and was imprisoned in the old penitentiary in Nashville. After two harrowing weeks, she was released to her uncle Ed Jordan, a Nashville banker.

In 1866, Mary Overall wed John W. Headley, a prominent and handsome Secretary of State (1891-1895) in Kentucky. The two had served as spies for both Morgan and Gen. Braxton Bragg. In 1862, Headley was 1st Lieutenant of Company K, First Kentucky Calvary. Headley later served as a Confederate agent in Canada. In 1906, he wrote a book regarding his Confederacy wartime experiences.

Mary and John had four sons and two daughters. Before moving into Kentucky politics, Mary and John lived in Evansville, IN, and worked in the to***co industry. This couple was able to prosper after the war, a feat most post-war Tennesseans never attained.

In 1910, Mary (age 66) and John moved to Beverly Hills, Calif., where she died 20 years later. She is buried today at Inglewood Park Cemetery in California beside her husband.

Endurance and fortitude were virtues of the day for women, such as the indomitable Mary Overall. Serving as a spymaster within Rutherford County, she was a legend in her own time.

Happy Birthday Brig. General William Robertson Boggs, born on this day March 18, 1829 in Augusta, GA.
03/18/2021

Happy Birthday Brig. General William Robertson Boggs, born on this day March 18, 1829 in Augusta, GA.

John Pelham by James R. RandallJust as the spring came laughing through the strife,With all its gorgeous cheer;In the br...
03/17/2021

John Pelham by James R. Randall

Just as the spring came laughing through the strife,
With all its gorgeous cheer;
In the bright April of historic life
Fell the great cannoneer.

The wondrous lulling of a hero's breath
His bleeding country weeps--
Hushed in the alabaster arms of death,
Our young Marcellus sleeps.

Nobler and grander than the Child of Rome,
Curbing his chariot steeds;
The knightly scion of a Southern home
Dazzled the land with deeds.

Gentlest and bravest in the battle brunt,
The champion of the truth,
He bore his banner to the very front
Of our immortal youth.

A clang of sabres 'mid Virginian snow,
The fiery pang of shells--
And there's a wail of immemorial woe
In Alabama dells.

The pennon drops that led the sacred band
Along the crimson field;
The meteor blade sinks from the nerveless hand
Over the spotless shield.

We gazed and gazed upon that beauteous face
While 'round the lips and eyes,
Couched in the marble slumber, flashed the grace
Of a divine surprise.

Oh, mother of a blessed soul on high!
Thy tears may soon be shed--
Think of thy boy with princes of the sky,
Among the Southern dead.

How must he smile on this dull world beneath,
Fevered with swift renown--
He--with the martyr's amaranthine wreath
Twining the victor's crown!

Born in Ireland and a veteran of the British Royal Army, Patrick Ronayne Cleburne immigrated to the United States in 184...
03/17/2021

Born in Ireland and a veteran of the British Royal Army, Patrick Ronayne Cleburne immigrated to the United States in 1849, eventually settling in Helena, Arkansas. When impending war threatened his adopted home in 1861, he wasted no time in rushing to its defense, and by 1862 the Irishman had risen from private to brigadier general.

From the battles of Shiloh to Franklin, Cleburne distinguished himself as both a brigade and division commander, and was wounded at both the battles of Richmond and Perryville. His division became one of the crack units in the Army of Tennessee, and its leader eventually came to be known as “the Stonewall of the West.”

Like Stonewall Jackson, Patrick Cleburne ultimately fell in the fight for Southern independence. Upon hearing of Cleburne's death at Franklin Gen. William J. Hardee offered this tribute to his erstwhile subordinate: "Where this division defended, no odds broke its line; where it attacked, no numbers resisted its onslaught, save only once; and there is the grave of Cleburne."

On March 17, 1863, Confederate Major John Pelham was killed at the Battle of Kellys Ford in Virginia. Pelham participate...
03/17/2021

On March 17, 1863, Confederate Major John Pelham was killed at the Battle of Kellys Ford in Virginia. Pelham participated in a cavalry charge, since his artillery not being engaged. Standing up in his stirrups, he urged his men to "Press forward, press forward to glory and victory!" Not long afterward, he was struck in the head by a fragment of an exploding Federal artillery shell. He was carried six miles from the battlefield to Culpeper Courthouse, and died the following morning without having regained consciousness. Confederate General J E B Stuart said of his death, in a general order to the rest of his division:

The major-general commanding approaches with reluctance the painful duty of announcing to the division its irreparable loss in the death of Major John Pelham, commanding the Horse Artillery. He fell mortally wounded in the battle of Kellysville, March 17th, with the battle-cry on his lips, and the light of victory beaming from his eye... His eye had glanced on every battlefield of this army from the First Manassas to the moment of his death, and he was, with a single exception, a brilliant actor in them all. The memory of "the gallant Pelham," his many manly virtues, his noble nature and purity of character, are enshrined as a sacred legacy in the hearts of all who knew him. His record has been bright and spotless, his career brilliant and successful.

The Battle of Kelly's Ford, also known as the Battle of Kellysville or Kelleysville, took place on March 17, 1863, in Cu...
03/17/2021

The Battle of Kelly's Ford, also known as the Battle of Kellysville or Kelleysville, took place on March 17, 1863, in Culpeper County, Virginia, as part of the cavalry operations along the Rappahannock River during the War Between the States. It set the stage for Brandy Station and other cavalry actions of the Gettysburg Campaign that summer. Twenty-one hundred troopers of Union General William W. Averell's Union cavalry division crossed the Rappahannock to attack the Confederate cavalry that had been harassing them that winter. Confederate General Fitzhugh Lee counterattacked with a brigade of about 800 men. After achieving a localized success, Union forces withdrew under pressure in late afternoon, without destroying Lee's cavalry.

In 1864, 20-year-old Vicksburg, Mississippi resident Emma Kline was arrested by Union officials who were then occupying ...
03/17/2021

In 1864, 20-year-old Vicksburg, Mississippi resident Emma Kline was arrested by Union officials who were then occupying the city. She was charged with the crime of smuggling. She was one of a group of women who engaged in smuggling much-needed supplies out of Vicksburg and into the area east of the Big Black River, which was still held by the Confederacy.

Union authorities created a photograph of Kline with two of her captors, both members of the 5th Iowa Infantry, and published it in the newspapers as a warning to other women involved in smuggling.

It is doubtful that Emma Kline was ever tried for her crime, but she probably spent some time in the Warren County jail, as did many civilians who angered the Union occupation troops in Vicksburg. The entire Kline family was eventually exiled from Warren County by this order:

HEADQUARTERS SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS, Vicksburg, Miss., January 26, 1864.

Major EASTMAN,
Commanding Cavalry, Red Bone Church:

MAJOR: It is reported to me on good authority that a party of Whitaker's band, say 15 or 20, contemplate crossing the Big Black to-night in the vicinity of Hall's or Regan's Ferries, and will probably come over to Mrs. Stowe's place, or possibly to Nelian Kline's. I desire you to entrap and catch these outlaws if you can. I am also well satisfied that the Kline family, and especially Miss Kline, are guilty of acting in bad faith toward our Government and imparting information to the enemy.

You will, therefore, take immediate steps to put the whole family across the Big Black, not to return to this side without written permission from the proper military authorities, under penalty of being dealt with as spies. They will be permitted to take their household furniture and private clothing, and a complete inventory will be taken of what remains and a guard placed over it until it can be turned over to the U. S. Treasury agent.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JAS. B. McPHERSON,
Major-General

The Nelian Kline mentioned by McPherson is Emma's father Nineon E. Kline, a rich planter who lived in the Redbone community south of Vicksburg.

Happy Birthday Maj. General Patrick Ronayne Cleburne, born on this day March 17, 1828 in Cork County, Ireland.
03/17/2021

Happy Birthday Maj. General Patrick Ronayne Cleburne, born on this day March 17, 1828 in Cork County, Ireland.

Happy St. Patrick's Day!
03/17/2021

Happy St. Patrick's Day!

Cleburne by M. A. Jennings of AlabamaPublished in the Selma Dispatch, 1864Another ray of light hath fled, another Southe...
03/16/2021

Cleburne by M. A. Jennings of Alabama
Published in the Selma Dispatch, 1864

Another ray of light hath fled, another Southern brave
Hath fallen in his country's cause and found a laureled grave--
Hath fallen, but his deathless name shall live when starts shall set,
For, noble Cleburne, thou art one this world will ne'er forget.

'Tis true, they warm heart beats no more, that on they noble head
Azrael place his icy hand, and thou art with the dead;
The glancing of thine eyes are dim; no more will they be bright
Until they ope in Paradise, with clearer, heavenlier light.

No battle news disturbs they rest upon the sun-bright shore,
No clarion voice awakens thee on earth to wrestle more,
No tramping steed, no wary foe bids thee awake, arise,
For thou art in the angel world, beyond the starry skies.

Brave Cleburn, dream in thy low bed, with pulseless, deadened heart;
Calm, calm and sweet, O warrior rest! thou well hast borne thy part,
And now a glory wreath for thee the angels singing twine,
A glory wreath, not of the earth, but made by hands divine.

A long farewell--we give thee up, with all they bright renown,
A chieftain here on earth is lost, in heaven an angel found.
Above they grave a wall is heard--a nation mourns her dead;
A nobler for the South ne'er died, a braver never bled.

A last farewell--how can we speak the bitter word farewell!
The anguish of our bleeding hearts vain words may never tell.
Sleep on, sleep on, to God we give our chieftain in his might;
And weeping, feel he lives on high, where comes no sorrow's night.

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Please help us in Wilmington, NC. Our monuments are under serious threat. We have been having protests nightly for over a week. Our city has given permits for the protests to continue nightly for a year. They have a petition circulating with 5000 signatures. There is a community review board working with the city to remove the monuments. Please sign our petition and forward to everyone you know. We need your help.
Look what the criminals are doing now...inciting arson. "Put it in a museum where it belongs!" Well, they already set fire to our beautiful museum--the UDC Memorial Building in Richmond. So much destruction! So many precious artifacts and records lost! Now they are inciting further arson and using it for a fundraiser too! Where the heck is law enforcement? Where the heck is the judicial system? Oh! Lying face down in the street...while the country burns.
R.I.P. Hero
❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️
The Descendants of the Confederate Officers Corps (“The Corp”) is open to any member of the Florida Division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, members of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and members of the Order of the Confederate Rose who is either a lineal or collateral descendant of a Confederate Officer who served honorably during any portion of the War Between the State from 1861 through 1865. This will include associate members who are members of other Camps or Chapter outside the State of Florida who maintain an associate membership with a Florida Division Camp or Chapter. Membership is a $50 one-time donation. If you are interested in this fraternal sub-organization of the SCV in Florida, please contact me directly at [email protected]
Thanks for sharing and the recognition
Good job! I’m from the very heart of Dixie!
Hi Y'all I am new to Facebook and I would love friends like you! I am a proud descendent of Commander Robert Edward Lee.
Members of the Turner Ashby Camp and the Clinton Hatcher Camp invite you to attend a Southern Cross of Honor Dedication November 4th 2018. Three Crosses will be dedicated for Ludwell Lee, who served in Company A 39th Virginia Cavalry Battalion (Lee’s Bodyguards); James William Lee, Company A 35th Virginia Cavalry Battalion (Whites Comanche’s); and William Franklin Kerfoot, Company B 8th Virginia Infantry. The ceremony will start at 2:00 pm and will be held at Ivy Hill Cemetery in Upperville, Virginia. If you have any questions about attending this ceremony contact myself Jason Lloyd, either through Facebook or my email address. You can also contact both camp Commanders and Adjutants of each camp Todd Kern of the Turner Ashby Camp or Adjutant Joseph Walkup. Also, Commander James Diehl of Clinton Hatcher Camp or Adjutant Ben Trittipoe for further information. Hope to see you there to honor these Southern Soldiers LEST WE FORGET Contact Information Jason Lloyd [email protected] Commander Todd Kern [email protected] Adjutant Joseph Walkup [email protected] Commander James Diehl [email protected] Adjutant Ben Trittipoe [email protected] “Up, Men, and to your posts! Don't forget today that you are from Old Virginia."