International Arts Mentors

International Arts Mentors iAM creates a space for kids to be the best versions of themselves using instruction and performance in music and the arts. We inspire kids to be the best versions of themselves, communities to work in harmony and artists to be of service.
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This is a nonprofit organization

Operating as usual

The arts inspire us to leave a place more beautiful than it was when we arrived.
05/08/2021

The arts inspire us to leave a place more beautiful than it was when we arrived.

Plant More Trees
🌲🌳🌴🌳🌲🌴

05/03/2021

iAM Safe Driving Scenario You should always know your friends and what they have on them when getting into your vehicle❤️🧡💚💙

Take the time and watch this beautiful #BlackHistoryMonth production by the children and adults at the Laurel Magnet Sch...
03/17/2021
How We Got Over- Laurel Magnet School of the Arts Black History Program 2021

Take the time and watch this beautiful #BlackHistoryMonth production by the children and adults at the Laurel Magnet School of the Arts in Laurel, Mississippi. We are so proud to say this beautiful town is the home of the first chapter of #internationalartsmentors .
#LaurelMississippi
#mentoringmatters

03/13/2021

#internationalartsmentors #LaurelMississippi
Creating a space for children to be the best versions of themselves.
Micah Brown and Sarah Nichols Smith , working it out.

03/09/2021

Our iAM theme for the month of March is Image ❤️🧡💚💙

03/05/2021
Happy Sunday from iAM where we are creating a space for kids to be the best versions of themselves!
02/28/2021

Happy Sunday from iAM where we are creating a space for kids to be the best versions of themselves!

Happy Sunday from iAM where we are creating a space for kids to be the best versions of themselves!

02/28/2021

👀 look at this

Photos from International Arts Mentors's post
02/27/2021

Photos from International Arts Mentors's post

02/26/2021

Amazing

02/25/2021

iAM kids, believing in our Mission.

#BlackHistoryMonth#internationalartsmentors#karenhallion
02/22/2021

#BlackHistoryMonth
#internationalartsmentors
#karenhallion

#BlackHistoryMonth
#internationalartsmentors
#karenhallion

02/16/2021
02/13/2021

Thanks Sarah you are the best and the kids absolutely adore you

Celebrating our history with this inspirational artistJames Joseph Brown (May 3, 1933 – December 25, 2006) was an Americ...
02/10/2021

Celebrating our history with this inspirational artist

James Joseph Brown (May 3, 1933 – December 25, 2006) was an American singer, songwriter, dancer, musician, record producer and bandleader. A progenitor of funk music and a major figure of 20th-century music dance, he is often referred to by the honorific nicknames "Godfather of Soul", "Mr. Dynamite", and "Soul Brother No. 1". In a career that lasted over 50 years, he influenced the development of several music genres. Brown was one of the first ten inductees into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at its inaugural induction dinner in New York on January 23, 1986.

Brown began his career as a gospel singer in Toccoa, Georgia. He first came to national public attention in the mid-1950s as the lead singer of The Famous Flames, a rhythm and blues vocal group founded by Bobby Byrd. With the hit ballads "Please, Please, Please" and "Try Me", Brown built a reputation as a tireless live performer with the Famous Flames and his backing band, sometimes known as the James Brown Band or the James Brown Orchestra. His success peaked in the 1960s with the live album Live at the Apollo and hit singles such as "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag", "I Got You (I Feel Good)" and "It's a Man's Man's Man's World".

During the late 1960s, Brown moved from a continuum of blues and gospel-based forms and styles to a profoundly "Africanized" approach to music-making, emphasizing stripped-down and interlocking rhythms, that influenced the development of funk music. By the early 1970s, Brown had fully established the funk sound after the formation of the J.B.s with records such as "Get Up (I Feel Like Being a) Sex Machine" and "The Payback". He also became noted for songs of social commentary, including the 1968 hit "Say It Loud – I'm Black and I'm Proud". Brown continued to perform and record until his death from pneumonia in 2006.

Brown recorded 17 singles that reached No. 1 on the Billboard R&B charts. He also holds the record for the most singles listed on the Billboard Hot 100 chart which did not reach No. 1. Brown was inducted into the first class of the Rhythm & Blues Music Hall of Fame in 2013 as an artist and then in 2017 as a songwriter. He also received honors from several other institutions, including inductions into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. In Joel Whitburn's analysis of the Billboard R&B charts from 1942 to 2010, Brown is ranked No. 1 in The Top 500 Artists. He is ranked No. 7 on Rolling Stone's list of its 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.

Mary Violet Leontyne Price (born February 10, 1927) is an American soprano. Born and raised in Laurel, Mississippi,[1] s...
02/07/2021

Mary Violet Leontyne Price (born February 10, 1927) is an American soprano. Born and raised in Laurel, Mississippi,[1] she rose to international acclaim in the 1950s and 1960s, and was the first African American to become a leading performer at the Metropolitan Opera, and one of the most popular American classical singers of her generation.

Leontyne Price in 1994
Reviewing her televised farewell opera performance at the Met in 1985, as Aida, one critic described Price's voice as "vibrant," "soaring" and "a Price beyond pearls." Time magazine called her voice "Rich, supple and shining, it was in its prime capable of effortless soaring from a smoky mezzo to the pure soprano gold of a perfectly spun high C."

A lirico spinto (Italian for "pushed lyric") soprano, she was considered especially well suited to the heroines of Verdi's "middle period" operas: Aida, the Leonoras of Il trovatore and La forza del destino. and Amelia in Un ballo in maschera. She also was noted for her interpretations of leading roles in operas by Giacomo Puccini and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

After her retirement from opera, she continued to appear in recitals and orchestral concerts until 1997.

Among her many honors and awards are the Presidential Medal of Freedom (1964), the Spingarn Medal (1965), the Kennedy Center Honors (1980), the National Medal of Arts (1985), the Golden Plate Award of the American Academy of Achievement (1986), numerous honorary degrees, and 19 Grammy Awards for operatic and song recitals and full operas, and a Lifetime Achievement Award, more than any other classical singer. In October 2008, she was among the first recipients of the Opera Honors by the National Endowment for the Arts. In 2019, Leontyne Price was awarded an honorary doctorate degree from Boston Conservatory at Berklee.

Mary Violet Leontyne Price (born February 10, 1927) is an American soprano. Born and raised in Laurel, Mississippi,[1] she rose to international acclaim in the 1950s and 1960s, and was the first African American to become a leading performer at the Metropolitan Opera, and one of the most popular American classical singers of her generation.

Leontyne Price in 1994
Reviewing her televised farewell opera performance at the Met in 1985, as Aida, one critic described Price's voice as "vibrant," "soaring" and "a Price beyond pearls." Time magazine called her voice "Rich, supple and shining, it was in its prime capable of effortless soaring from a smoky mezzo to the pure soprano gold of a perfectly spun high C."

A lirico spinto (Italian for "pushed lyric") soprano, she was considered especially well suited to the heroines of Verdi's "middle period" operas: Aida, the Leonoras of Il trovatore and La forza del destino. and Amelia in Un ballo in maschera. She also was noted for her interpretations of leading roles in operas by Giacomo Puccini and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

After her retirement from opera, she continued to appear in recitals and orchestral concerts until 1997.

Among her many honors and awards are the Presidential Medal of Freedom (1964), the Spingarn Medal (1965), the Kennedy Center Honors (1980), the National Medal of Arts (1985), the Golden Plate Award of the American Academy of Achievement (1986), numerous honorary degrees, and 19 Grammy Awards for operatic and song recitals and full operas, and a Lifetime Achievement Award, more than any other classical singer. In October 2008, she was among the first recipients of the Opera Honors by the National Endowment for the Arts. In 2019, Leontyne Price was awarded an honorary doctorate degree from Boston Conservatory at Berklee.

Few artists have inspired or dedicated themselves to others more than the great Maya Angelou. We salute your compassion,...
02/04/2021

Few artists have inspired or dedicated themselves to others more than the great Maya Angelou. We salute your compassion, generosity, and strength.

Few artists have inspired or dedicated themselves to others more than the great Maya Angelou. We salute your compassion, generosity, and strength.

Louis Daniel Armstrong (August 4, 1901 – July 6, 1971), nicknamed "Satchmo","Satch", and "Pops" was an American trumpete...
02/02/2021

Louis Daniel Armstrong (August 4, 1901 – July 6, 1971), nicknamed "Satchmo","Satch", and "Pops" was an American trumpeter, composer, vocalist, and actor who was among the most influential figures in jazz. His career spanned five decades, from the 1920s to the 1960s, and different eras in the history of jazz.

Armstrong was born and raised in New Orleans. Coming to prominence in the 1920s as an inventive trumpet and cornet player, Armstrong was a foundational influence in jazz, shifting the focus of the music from collective improvisation to solo performance. Around 1922, he followed his mentor, Joe "King" Oliver, to Chicago to play in the Creole Jazz Band. In Chicago, he spent time with other popular jazz musicians, reconnecting with his friend Bix Beiderbecke and spending time with Hoagy Carmichael and Lil Hardin. He earned a reputation at "cutting contests" and his fame reached band leader Fletcher Henderson. Henderson persuaded Armstrong to come to New York City, where he became a featured and musically influential band soloist and recording artist. Hardin became Armstrong's second wife and they returned to Chicago to play together and then he began to form his own "Hot" jazz bands. After years of touring, he settled in Queens, and by the 1950s, he was a national musical icon, assisted in part, by his appearances on radio and in film and television, in addition to his concerts.

With his instantly recognizable rich, gravelly voice, Armstrong was also an influential singer and skillful improviser, bending the lyrics and melody of a song. He was also skilled at scat singing. Armstrong is renowned for his charismatic stage presence and voice as well as his trumpet playing. By the end of Armstrong's career in the 1960s, his influence had spread to popular music in general. Armstrong was one of the first popular African-American entertainers to "cross over" to wide popularity with white (and international) audiences. He rarely publicly politicized his race, to the dismay of fellow African Americans, but took a well-publicized stand for desegregation in the Little Rock crisis. He was able to access the upper echelons of American society at a time when this was difficult for black men.

Armstrong appeared in films such as High Society (1956) alongside Bing Crosby, Grace Kelly, and Frank Sinatra, and Hello, Dolly! (1969) starring Barbra Streisand. He received many accolades including three Grammy Award nominations and a win for his vocal performance of Hello, Dolly! in 1964. In 2017, he was posthumously inducted into the Rhythm & Blues Hall of Fame.

Louis Daniel Armstrong (August 4, 1901 – July 6, 1971), nicknamed "Satchmo","Satch", and "Pops" was an American trumpeter, composer, vocalist, and actor who was among the most influential figures in jazz. His career spanned five decades, from the 1920s to the 1960s, and different eras in the history of jazz.

Armstrong was born and raised in New Orleans. Coming to prominence in the 1920s as an inventive trumpet and cornet player, Armstrong was a foundational influence in jazz, shifting the focus of the music from collective improvisation to solo performance. Around 1922, he followed his mentor, Joe "King" Oliver, to Chicago to play in the Creole Jazz Band. In Chicago, he spent time with other popular jazz musicians, reconnecting with his friend Bix Beiderbecke and spending time with Hoagy Carmichael and Lil Hardin. He earned a reputation at "cutting contests" and his fame reached band leader Fletcher Henderson. Henderson persuaded Armstrong to come to New York City, where he became a featured and musically influential band soloist and recording artist. Hardin became Armstrong's second wife and they returned to Chicago to play together and then he began to form his own "Hot" jazz bands. After years of touring, he settled in Queens, and by the 1950s, he was a national musical icon, assisted in part, by his appearances on radio and in film and television, in addition to his concerts.

With his instantly recognizable rich, gravelly voice, Armstrong was also an influential singer and skillful improviser, bending the lyrics and melody of a song. He was also skilled at scat singing. Armstrong is renowned for his charismatic stage presence and voice as well as his trumpet playing. By the end of Armstrong's career in the 1960s, his influence had spread to popular music in general. Armstrong was one of the first popular African-American entertainers to "cross over" to wide popularity with white (and international) audiences. He rarely publicly politicized his race, to the dismay of fellow African Americans, but took a well-publicized stand for desegregation in the Little Rock crisis. He was able to access the upper echelons of American society at a time when this was difficult for black men.

Armstrong appeared in films such as High Society (1956) alongside Bing Crosby, Grace Kelly, and Frank Sinatra, and Hello, Dolly! (1969) starring Barbra Streisand. He received many accolades including three Grammy Award nominations and a win for his vocal performance of Hello, Dolly! in 1964. In 2017, he was posthumously inducted into the Rhythm & Blues Hall of Fame.

Couldn't have said it better, Hip Hop Generation!#internationalartsmentors #socioemotionallearning #artistsbeingofservic...
01/24/2021

Couldn't have said it better, Hip Hop Generation!
#internationalartsmentors
#socioemotionallearning
#artistsbeingofservice
#communitiesworkinginharmony

01/21/2021

Happy Thursday!

12/27/2020
Edutopia

iAM is inspired by science.

The arts—music, theater, drawing and painting—are powerful tools for making sense of the world. New studies are beginning to pull them back towards the *center* of the academic curriculum. 🎨🎭🎸

iAM Joyful. 😌
12/26/2020

iAM Joyful. 😌

12/19/2020
12/19/2020
12/19/2020
12/19/2020
Bird Dog Cafe

Come see Micah and some of our iAM kids at Bird Dog Cafe!

Happy Friday!! We’ll have some awesome live Saxophone music played by Micah tonight starting about 7:30. #birddogcafe #livemusic #music #internationalartsmentors #laurelms #laurelmississippi #laurelmainstreet #downtownlaurel #iliveinlaurel #visitlaureljonescounty

12/18/2020
Thanks
12/13/2020

Thanks

We at internationalartsmentors IAM would like to extend a warm thank you to Nancee Scott and Lillie Scott-Carter for coming out to decorate and cater our event, and Ray Carter for helping out in the music department. A special thank you also goes to everyone that contributed time in making this event special. Your hard work is appreciated.
#internationalartsmentors
#LaurelMississippi
#iAM
#iamkids
#iammentors
#iamparents
#internationalmentors.org

We at internationalartsmentors IAM would like to extend a warm thank you to Nancee Scott and Lillie Scott-Carter for com...
12/13/2020

We at internationalartsmentors IAM would like to extend a warm thank you to Nancee Scott and Lillie Scott-Carter for coming out to decorate and cater our event, and Ray Carter for helping out in the music department. A special thank you also goes to everyone that contributed time in making this event special. Your hard work is appreciated.
#internationalartsmentors
#LaurelMississippi
#iAM
#iamkids
#iammentors
#iamparents
#internationalmentors.org

12/11/2020
International Arts Mentors Day(iAM)6:00-8:00 pm#internationalartsmentors#LaurelMississippi#internationalartsmentors.org
12/10/2020

International Arts Mentors Day(iAM)
6:00-8:00 pm
#internationalartsmentors
#LaurelMississippi
#internationalartsmentors.org

Address

111 E 13th St
Laurel, MS
39440

Opening Hours

Thursday 18:00 - 20:00

Telephone

(214) 682-8778

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