CueSign, Inc.

CueSign, Inc. CueSign, Inc. is an all-inclusive and thriving bilingual and multilingual community with diverse backgrounds who support ASL and Cued American English.

Operating as usual

[ID: Teal blue square with thin sea foam green border. Cream-colored text says, “The way we speak to our kids about thei...
09/16/2021

[ID: Teal blue square with thin sea foam green border. Cream-colored text says, “The way we speak to our kids about their hearing loss can determine how they grow up feeling about it. If you tell them they are capable, they will be capable. If you tell them it will not limit them, they will soar!” After the first sentence, in tiny cream letters, it says, “My Battle Call”. At the bottom, after the last sentence, in cream letters, it says, “My Battle Call by Valli Gideons”. To you left of the text is the My Battle Call logo, which includes a drawing of a hearing aid and cochlear implant cord arranged in the shape of a heart.]

It’s a mindset.
You’ve got this!

#DeafAwarenessMonth

At CueSign, Inc,. we support multimodal bilingualism, with the belief that all DDBHH people have the right to language t...
08/13/2021

At CueSign, Inc,. we support multimodal bilingualism, with the belief that all DDBHH people have the right to language that is fully accessible to them.

We see this assumption a lot: because we advocate for ASL for Deaf kids, we must be against oral English. Why is that the logical conclusion? The two languages are not mutually exclusive. In fact, ASL-English bilingualism is the approach that has the most evidence behind it. Bimodal bilingualism is highly beneficial for Deaf kids. When we advocate for ASL for Deaf kids, we aren't saying they shouldn't also learn English. It's just that English is the default and people don't need to be convinced of its importance. We are trying to get ASL to the same point.

NOTE: We use the word "Deaf" as an inclusive term for all Deaf, hard of hearing, DeafBlind, DeafDisabled, and late-deafened children.

Image description: Pro-ASL does not mean anti-English.

Registration for Camp ILA is open now! Go to www.cuedspeechassocmaine.Wordpress.com to sign up. This camp-style learning...
08/06/2021

Registration for Camp ILA is open now! Go to www.cuedspeechassocmaine.Wordpress.com to sign up. This camp-style learning experience will provide space for social distancing, masking as per your personal comfort, and adults-only campers.

08/04/2021

CueSign, Inc., wishes to recognize board Vice President Angela Titus Kuhn for her presentation to Cue Camp New England, hosted by Cued Speech New England, last Saturday, July 31.

Her presentation was titled, “One Size Does Not Fit All: How an Administrator/Teacher/Mother/Wife Came to Know the Top Ten Things You Need to be Effective in Deaf Education Today”.

One attendee commented that Mrs. Kuhn’s presentation was lively and poignant, as she shared her fascinating personal story, along with details about the journey of growth at the Illinois School for the Deaf as they endeavor to continue to provide inclusive programming for all the deaf children they serve.

Kudos, Angela! 🥳

Hands & Voices has so many fantastic resources for families and professionals! Pop by their waiting room to check out a ...
08/03/2021
Hands & Voices

Hands & Voices has so many fantastic resources for families and professionals! Pop by their waiting room to check out a few of them: https://handsandvoices.org/virtual-waiting-room/index.html?fbclid=IwAR2eYCULVIpENX8LV8NGRRNnU94pKc6BlX4u5kR42q8IYGPRuERfS4axY_U

This project is supported by the Association of Maternal & Child Health Programs (AMCHP) through its grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $4,000,000 with 0% percentage financed with n...

The skill of a child’s ASL interpreter and/or Cued Language Transliterator matters tremendously.
08/02/2021

The skill of a child’s ASL interpreter and/or Cued Language Transliterator matters tremendously.

The skill level of a Deaf child's educational interpreter is enormously important. Find out more here: http://ourncad.org/for-parents.html?devicelock=desktop&fbclid=IwAR2xxKPV9phpeDMhaRhU9FfI_frCGdaWtJQlNv7IFCzUeuA2dtWYq_2U0hk

NOTE: We use the word "Deaf" as an inclusive term for all Deaf, hard of hearing, DeafBlind, DeafDisabled, and late-deafened children.

Full citation: Schick, B., Williams, K., Kupermintz, H. (2005). Look who’s being left behind: Educational interpreters and access to education for deaf and hard-of-hearing students. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 11(1).

Image description: Interpreters with weak performance skills do not simply modify the teacher’s message so that it is simpler. There are many omissions of concepts and concepts that are not understandable in the interpreted version. These random errors, distortions, and deletions must have a large, detrimental effect on a young learner, especially one who may already be behind his hearing peers. The classroom content, as it is delivered to the student, is unlikely to be the same as what the hearing peers are receiving” (Schick et al., 2005, p. 16).

Happy Friday! Enjoy this story four different ways: in ASL, in Cued American English, in ASL with spoken English, and in...
07/30/2021

Happy Friday! Enjoy this story four different ways: in ASL, in Cued American English, in ASL with spoken English, and in spoken English.

Follow this link to the Maine Hands & Voices page to experience these videos. 💕

We apologize! The timing of last night's book reading postings were off due to tech issues, but all four modalities are up now! Be sure to check them all out when you get the chance!

We'd like to thank the guest readers for taking the time to do this special book reading, the people behind the scenes for taking the time to set up this event, and to all our wonderful families for supporting us! We wouldn't be here without you all!

If you enjoyed the videos, please be sure to let us know by commenting on the videos, or consider making a donation to our non-profit organization so we can continue to provide more events for you!

The Cued Speech Association of Maine, in partnership with CueSign, Inc., CueOn, and Language Matters, Inc., presents: Ca...
07/27/2021

The Cued Speech Association of Maine, in partnership with CueSign, Inc., CueOn, and Language Matters, Inc., presents: Camp ILA — visual language Instruction, Literacy, and Access.

Find all of the below information here on the events tab of CSAME’s website: https://cuedspeechassocmaine.wordpress.com.

[The logos for CSAME, CueSign, Inc., CueOn, and LMI are present on the flyer.]

October 8-11, 2021 Pine Tree Camp 114 Pine Tree Camp Rd., Rome, Maine

This activity is approved for 2.2 ASHA CEUs. This activity is pending RID CEUs (2.0+) and TECUnit CEHs (20+).

Camp ILA is a unique learning experience where professionals and parents can learn or improve their American Sign Language or Cued American English skills by taking a class in one of 3 tracks: Instruction, Literacy, & Access.

Professionals in the fields of speech-language pathology, sign language interpreting, cued language transliteration, deaf education, special education, and regular education can all benefit from the learning opportunities provided. This is an in-person, all-inclusive, adults-only camp learning experience at Pine Tree Camp in Maine. Pine Tree offers a beautiful, ADA accessible campus where we will enjoy a relaxed atmosphere with camp activities (think boating, ropes course, and campfires, etc.) for opportunities for immersion, community-building, and joy.

Join us!

Course descriptions:

Instruction:
ASL I Beginner level. No previous knowledge required. Learn basic rules and structures for comprehension and expression of ASL: signing space, pragmatics, vocabulary, fingerspelling, classifiers, sentence structure, conversational phrases.
Instructor: Amy Crumrine

ASL II Pre-requisite: Basic knowledge of signs/ASL required. Expand on the rules and structures for comprehension and expression of ASL. Use basic conversation and participate in simple book sharing.
Instructor: Tommy Minch

ASL III Pre-requisite: Knowledge and use of signs/ ASL in basic conversation required. Develop more complex skills for comprehension and expression of ASL. Work on complexity and fluency of language use in conversation and storytelling. Instructor: Kevin Bohlin

All of Camp ILA’s ASL instructors are Deaf, fluent ASL users with teaching experience.

Instruction:
Cued Speech for Beginners: No previous knowledge required. Learn the entire Cued Speech system, both receptive and expressive cueing skills. Instructor: Stephanie Payonk

Cued Speech/Cued Language Application Pre-requisite: Ability to cue words slowly. Builds on basic introduction to CS with the goal to gain confidence and “cue-municate” more easily. Practice expressive and receptive cueing skills in activities that can be used at home, at work and play. Build strategies to improve cueing skills on your own and learn about resources for networking and future learning opportunities. Instructor: Carolyn Ostrander

Cued Language Conversation: Ability to cue sentences slowly required. Lead by a native Deaf cuer, cueing and cuereading skills developed and practiced in conversation and other activities to gain fluency. Instructor: Daniel Koo

All of Camp ILA’s Cued Speech and Cued Language instructors have extensive Cued Speech and instructional experience.

Literacy:
Phonological Skills, Phonics & Visual Strategies
No previous knowledge required.
Reading comprehension is the result of a culmination of complex interactions of language, cognitive and literacy skills. This class covers the foundational phonological skills for reading and writing. Learn the hierarchy of skills and practice strategies to interpret or teach the skills using the Cued Speech system and materials to provide visual access for all learners including D/deaf and hard of hearing students and English language learners. Various instructional materials will be used for activities. You may also bring the reading/writing curriculum you currently use to implement the new strategies.

Instructor: Nicole Dobson
Nicole Dobson, MS, CCC-SLP, is a teacher of the deaf, a speech-language pathologist, and an NCSA certified Cued Speech instructor.

Access:
ASL Interpreting and cued language transliterating mentor/mentee program

This is a hands-on learning opportunity for ASL interpreters and CLTs at any level: no previous experience, developing skills, or sharpening skills. Mentor interpreters/transliterators will work with mentees throughout camp programming to provide a guided and supported learning experience.

The group instructor will provide both the mentor and mentee with guidelines and worksheets to work through the activities and observations. Mentees will observe mentors working and participate in discussions regarding the skills observed and potentially interpret/transliterate some activities if desired and if requisite skills are demonstrated.
Instructors: Lauren Pruett & Jill Burress

Lauren Pruett, TSC, is a nationally certified Cued Language Transliterator, and the president of Language Matters, Inc. Lauren has extensive experience coordinating, training, and mentoring CLTs across the US.

Jill Burress, MS, CCC-SLP, NIC, is a nationally certified ASL interpreter, speech-language pathologist, and faculty member at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Additionally, Jill has years of experience as a cued language transliterator and Cued Speech instructor.

Disclosures
Financial: Instructors will be receiving a stipend for their services: Amy Crumrine, Tommy Minch, Kevin Bohlin, Nicole Dobson, Stephanie Payonk, Carolyn Ostrander, Daniel Koo, Lauren Pruett, Jill Burress.

Non-financial: Instructors do not have any relevant financial relationship to the material that will be discussed as part of this course: Amy Crumrine, Tommy Minch, Kevin Bohlin, Nicole Dobson, Stephanie Payonk, Carolyn Ostrander, Daniel Koo, Lauren Pruett, Jill Burress.

Learning Outcomes:
As a result of this activity, the participant will be able to describe the visual languages American Sign Language and Cued American English.

As a result of this activity, the participant will be able to describe the use of Cued Speech for the development of literacy skills.

As a result of this activity, the participant will be able to apply strategies taught using visual language for the development of language and literacy skills.

As a result of this activity, the participant will be able to demostrate comprehension of signed or cued language.

As a result of this activity, the participant will be able to demonstrate
expressive signed or cued language skills.

As a result of this activity, the participant will be able to discuss skills and strategies for ASL interpreting or cued language transliterating.

Anticipated Schedule:
Friday, Oct. 8th
10:00 Registration begins
12:30 Lunch
1:45-5:15 Presentations
Welcome - Nicole Dobson
ASL & Cued American English, “Hand in Hand” - Amy Crumrine
Setting the Bilingual Table: The Deaf Bilingual Child - Dr. Daniel Koo
5:30 Immersion Dinner
6:45-7:45 Community Groups Presentations
8:00 Campfire

Saturday, Oct. 9th
8:00 Immersion Breakfast
9:00-11:00 Classes
11:15-12:15 Immersion Camp Activities
12:30 Lunch
1:45-5:15 Classes
5:30 Dinner
6:45-7:45 DHH Panel 8:00 Campfire

Sunday, Oct. 10th
8:00 Immersion Breakfast
9:00-11:00 Classes
11:15-12:15 Immersion Camp Activities
12:30 Lunch
1:45-5:15 Classes
5:30 Dinner
6:45-7:45 Professional Panel
8:00 Campfire

Monday, Oct. 11th
8:00 Immersion Breakfast
9:00-12:30 Classes
12:30 Lunch
Depart

Registration fees
Per Person:
Professional: $375
Parent/Family Member: $250
Student (adult): $200

Group rate:
Professional: (3+) $325 pp
Parent/Family Member: (2+) $200 pp
Student: (2+) $150 pp

Registration Link: https://forms.gle/1LBsX5admwWJg2aP9

Payment in full is due at the time of registration.

Refunds will be made to those registrants who cancel, less a $75 processing fee, with written request submitted on or before September 17th, 2021.

50% will be refunded with a written request submitted September 18th, 2021 through September 30th, 2021.

No refunds will be made after September 30th, 2021.

Substitutions are welcome at no charge.

Please email cancellations or substitutions to: [email protected].

Questions??
email Nicole Dobson: [email protected]

Getting here:
Check out our padlet page: https://padlet.com/jkbnca/CampILATravel

Camp ILA wishes to extend a hearty thank you to the National Cued Speech Association for their contribution.

07/25/2021
Padapillo with ASL and Cued American English

We love this example of complete, visual access to language—signed languages (like ASL) and cued languages (like Cued American English) go hand in hand!

Way to go, Maryland/DC Hands & Voices.

Shared from Brianne Burger:Deaf athletes competing in the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games: Emma Meesseman is competing at the O...
07/24/2021

Shared from Brianne Burger:

Deaf athletes competing in the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games:

Emma Meesseman is competing at the Olympics for the first time and she is a professional basketball player who plays Power Forward or Center position for the Washington Mystics - the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) champion in 2019. She is representing Belgium.

David Smith has been picked for his third straight Olympic appearance for the USA men's volleyball team. Smith was part of the USA team that lost in the quarterfinals at the Games held in London in 2012 and won the bronze medal at the Games held in Rio de Janeiro in 2016.

Did you know that over 30 Deaf and Hard of Hearing athletes have competed in the Olympics?

- Carlo Orlandi of Italy won a gold medal in Boxing in 1928.

- Ildiko Rejto of Hungary is the most decorated Deaf athlete of the Olympic Games with a total of 7 medals, including two gold in Fencing.

- Jeffrey Float, a swimmer from the USA, is a World Record holder, World Champion and Olympic Gold Medalist.

- Terence Parkin, a swimmer from South Africa, was a silver medalist at the Olympics in 2000. He has also won 29 gold medals at the Deaflympic Games between 1997 and 2009.

Providing visual (or tactile) languages for deaf or hard of hearing children helps give them access to incidental learni...
07/22/2021

Providing visual (or tactile) languages for deaf or hard of hearing children helps give them access to incidental learning—American Sign Language and Cued American English are two ways to present complete visual access to language.

Thanks to Audiology Outside the Box PLLC for this educational post!

Every day, we learn new things about the world and get reinforcement for what we know already. Most of this happens through "incidental learning": learning that isn't planned. It's learning that we do outside of a structured lesson. Due to lack of communication access, deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children often miss incidental learning opportunities that are easily accessible for other children.

Here's an example: you are having a spoken English conversation about preparing for a trip to the grocery store. You are asking everyone in the family what they want to add to the list. Maybe you are discussing prices for items, brands, and varieties of the same food (e.g. skim milk vs. whole milk). Maybe you're ordering the list by aisles and stating that aloud. What can a child learn from this conversation? Many new concepts! Just from listening to this conversation, without ever being taught in a formal setting, a child might learn:

1) That there is a place called the "grocery store".
2) That we get food at the grocery store.
3) That there are different types of food with different names.
4) That there are variations and brands of the same food.
5) That food costs money.
6) That some brands are more expensive than others.
7) That there are reasons for buying a more or less expensive brand of the same food.
8 ) That the grocery store is set up in a specific way with different categories of food in different places (e.g. freezer section vs. bread aisle).
9) That getting around the grocery store efficiently and saving time requires some planning in advance.
10) That other people have favorite foods that might be different from the child's own favorites.

Most hearing children will have full access to this grocery store conversation and can learn all of the above effortlessly. But now, let's say that the child is DHH and uses hearing devices. How much they learn depends on how well they can hear the conversation and understand its meaning in spoken English.

Maximizing DHH children's access to incidental learning is important for their development. Giving a child multiple language and communication opportunities, both visual and spoken, can help maximize that access!

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Our Story

Some people may be wondering how CueSign started and Facebook likes an official date of establishment. In reality, there is no single date of when communities form as they naturally evolve over time. American Sign Language (ASL) has been documented for hundreds of years and is still rapidly evolving due to advancements in academic ASL and the emergence of regional dialects. Cued Speech (the system), cued languages, and cued American English were created only five decades ago with the singular purpose of supporting literacy in deaf and hard of hearing people. Today, it has grown into 60+ visual adaptations for other spoken languages around the world and has found multiple benefits beyond the deaf and hard of hearing communities.

Historically, parents and caregivers have had to chose only one pathway for their deaf and hard of children: oralism or sign language. As those children grew up into adulthood, they have frequently found themselves at a crossroads - the majority of their families are hearing but they found solace and a different level of connection with peers like them. When Cued Speech emerged, it added another layer of complexity. It was a completely different way of accessing language and communication that was separate from ASL, yet it didn’t fit neatly within the oral sphere because Cued Speech uses manual cues and non-manual markers to provide 100% visual access. Often, those who had Cued Speech incorporated at some point in or throughout their entire lives also learned sign language.

These people along with their families, friends, and allies naturally formed a community, one in which inclusivity was cherished throughout, regardless of language and modality used, whether it was ASL or cued American English, and sometimes cued Spanish and cued modern Hebrew, among other dialects. This community has evolved into what is known today as the CueSign community, a community in which everyone is welcome and accepted, whether they are newbies or have been signing and/or cueing their entire lives.

Welcome to our community.

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Know anyone with a deaf child who is struggling to understand how their child will thrive? On May 15, at 11 a.m., Ryan Orlick Simka will talk about learning to embrace a child's deafness and help parents find their allies and supports. Text ValidEmbrace to 41444 to register today.
There has been a lot of interest in this class. I've been asked to show the marketing video that Gallaudet put together. Thanks for helping spread the word!
The CueSign board met tonight for nearly 2 hours-a special thanks for Visual Language Associates and Language Matters Inc for their support 💕
Board members, Amy Crumrine and Amy Fowler, gave a presentation on how to provide Cued American English and American Sign Language for deaf kids ages 0-3 at the EHDI conference in Kansas City, MO on March 8, 2020.
We are excited to share that Emile Burrow Mulholland has joined CueOn’s team as one of our Deaf cueducators! Thank you for supporting our growing business! 😄 Emilie Burrow Mulholland
Sharing an employment opportunity in accessibility services.
Daniel Koo and I are thrilled to share with the cueing nation that we are launching our new business, CueOn, LLC. This is an opportunity for all who have learned Cued Speech and would like to practice cueing with a deaf cueducator. Please help spread the word about our business! All details pertaining to CueOn is on our webiste: www.cue-on.com. You are welcome to like our page CueOn, LLC. 😃
Presented by Dr. Daniel Koo and Amy Crumrine Dr. Daniel Koo is the Treasurer for Cue Sign Inc. He works as a Professor of Psychology at Gallaudet University whose research interests lie in cognitive psychology and neurolinguistics. Deaf since birth, he began cueing when he was 9 and signing when he was 11. Now father to twin boys, Aspen and Logan, and husband to Sherry, he is actively involved in the deaf community and the boys’ sports activities. He also serves on the boards of Deaf Calvary Church and Hands and Voices. Amy Crumrine is the President for CueSign, Inc. She has worked in the deaf education field and is a high school ASL teacher for Montgomery County Public Schools. She is also an online Cued Speech instructor at Gallaudet University. Deaf since the age of 10 months, she learned how to cue when she was 5 years old and became immersed in the deaf community and with ASL at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf in Rochester, NY. She currently resides in Germantown, Maryland and is the mom of two grown children, Rosemary and Paul. She is married to her high school sweetheart of 22 years, Roy. Amy also serves on the Maryland/DC Hands and Voices board and the National Cued Speech Association.
We would like to extend our very special thanks to Gallaudet University for providing a CLT for the first time in Gallaudet's history. Congratulations go to @Jaemi Hagen for receiving these services after submitting a request to the university. This has been a very, very long time coming and I'd like to extend special thanks to the team-both cueing and Gallaudet's President's office for their diligence and team work in making this possible. We are being heard.
Cued American English (Online course) January 21 - March 13, 2020 Who can take the course? *Educators of the deaf and hard of hearing individuals *Family and friends of individuals with hearing loss *Deaf or hard of hearing persons *Adults with progressive or sudden hearing loss *Audiology professionals *Interpreters and other professionals who work with deaf or hard of hearing persons RID CMP: 2.5 RID CEUs. RID Academic Coursework Activity Report Form can be found on the CCOE website. Register Now! https://www.gallaudet.edu/ccoe/cued-asl-english
Us 3 representing CueSign, Inc. at Hands and Voices conference this weekend! 💕 Amy Crumrine-President Daniel Koo-Treasurer Lisa Weiss-Fundraising Chair
On Tuesday, September 24th, NCHAM will be hosting the webinar: "Families with Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children Thrive with Deaf and Hard of Hearing Adult Role Models" presented by Tawny Holmes Hlibok and Howard Rosenblum. Families need every type of resource available and that includes the support from experienced deaf and hard of hearing adults. The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) is excited to share more information about how families can obtain these opportunities. Direct resources will be shared such as programs, funding, organizations, apps, and conferences. For instance, the NAD recently launched a National Families Campaign that focuses on providing information to families. A panel of diverse deaf and hard of hearing adults will also be featured. Come and learn how your deaf or hard of hearing child can thrive more with adult role models! Learning Objectives: 1) Families will learn more about available deaf community resources and support and where to find them. 2) Families will understand the importance of including deaf and hard of hearing adults in their deaf or hard of hearing child's life. 3) Families will obtain positive information about strong future opportunities for their deaf and hard of hearing child. Presenter Bios: Tawny Holmes Hlibok is the Education Policy Counsel at the National Association of the Deaf, and in this role, she provides policy consultation on local, state, national, and global levels. She brings experience to the job, having taught deaf students of all ages, from early intervention home visits to post-secondary programs. In addition to her advocacy work, she coordinates the NAD Education Advocates program. Tawny also teaches at Gallaudet University, focusing on sign language rights and advocacy. She graduated from the Alabama School for the Deaf, obtained her BA degree in Deaf Studies and Sociology from Gallaudet Univeristy, and an MA in Deaf Education from Gallaudet University. She then received her JD degree from the University of Baltimore Law School. In her free time, she enjoys reading and keeping in touch with her four Deaf godchildren: Avant, Leilani, Oriana, and Talon. Howard Rosenblum is the Chief Executive Officer of the National Association of the Deaf (NAD). In this capacity, he oversees the operations of the NAD to carry out its mission of preserving, protecting and promoting the civil, human, and linguistic rights of deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States. He also serves as the Legal Director overseeing the staff lawyers as well as policy advocacy and litigation work within the NAD Law and Advocacy Center. Mr. Rosenblum has twenty-seven years of experience as a disability rights attorney include: seven years overseeing and directing the NAD Law and Advocacy Center; nine years as a Senior Attorney at Equip for Equality, a nonprofit organization designated as Illinois' Protection and Advocacy entity; and ten years before that with a private law firm. His legal practice has been in the areas of disability rights and special education. He is the primary author of the American Bar Association Guidelines on Court Access for Deaf and Hard of Hearing People and the sixth edition of the NAD Legal Rights: Guide for Deaf and Hard of Hearing People. He has provided numerous workshops nationally and internationally on the Americans with Disability Act, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. He currently serves as the legal advisor to the World Federation of the Deaf. In 2010, he was appointed by President Obama to serve on the U.S. Access Board and was reappointed in 2014. Mr. Rosenblum received his law degree from IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law (1992), and his Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Arizona (1988). Webinar date: Tuesday, September 24, 2019 Webinar start times (by time zone) 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm PT 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm MT 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm CT 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET Where: Adobe Connect - register click: https://usu.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_1M5ZpbEsa9HYFVP Download the adobeconnect app. For Windows: http://www.adobe.com/go/Connectsetup For Mac: http://www.adobe.com/go/ConnectSetupMac More download information is found at: https://helpx.adobe.com/adobe-connect/connect-downloads-updates.html Note: If your institution does not permit you to add the above link, you may go to the above URL directly, however, we have been advised that optimal perfomance is achieved via the app. Live captioning will also be provided; a link will be available for captioning upon logging into the webinar. This webinar will be recorded and posted online at www.infanthearing.org about a week after the webinar. There are no CEU's offered for this webinar. If you have questions about this webinar, please contact Mandy Jay at [email protected]. For technical assistance during the webinar, please contact Daniel Ladner at [email protected].