The Museum of Street Culture

The Museum of Street Culture The Museum of Street Culture will be a place where trained and untrained artists will collaborate and create art independently, involving people who live in the street and who work in the street.

The Museum of Street Culture is located in Encore Park in the heart of an historic area of downtown Dallas, flanked by the Farmers Market, City Hall, and the Main Street District. Pioneered by The Stewpot of First Presbyterian Church of Dallas and formally organized as a non-profit organization in 2013, Encore Park works with a diverse coalition of partners to coordinate programming that unites human services, creative arts, and historic preservation in an unprecedented collaborative system focused on building relationships and abundant life.

Read a new article about The Museum of Street Culture's important exhibitions and programs. Written by Alan Govenar with...
12/12/2018
The Museum of Street Culture

Read a new article about The Museum of Street Culture's important exhibitions and programs. Written by Alan Govenar with an intro by Elizabeth Merritt, VP Strategic Foresight and Founding Director, Center for the Future of Museums, American Alliance of Museums.

One national trend I’ve been tracking is the recent rise in people experiencing homelessness or housing insecurity. On any given night over a half million people in the US are coping with homelessn…

We’re here presenting on the civil and social role of the museum!
07/27/2018

We’re here presenting on the civil and social role of the museum!

Thank you @1814_magazine for visiting! You can schedule a free docent-led tour by emailing info@museumofstreetculture.or...
07/03/2018

Thank you @1814_magazine for visiting! You can schedule a free docent-led tour by emailing [email protected]

Thank you @avose for visiting! We have some exciting events coming up in the fall! Sign up for email updates at http://e...
07/02/2018

Thank you @avose for visiting! We have some exciting events coming up in the fall! Sign up for email updates at http://eepurl.com/c4dkYX

The Museum of Street Culture is now offering appointment only tours. To schedule a tour, email info@museumofstreetcultur...
06/20/2018

The Museum of Street Culture is now offering appointment only tours. To schedule a tour, email [email protected]

Thank you for visiting, Heather! To schedule a tour of Looking for Home: A Yearlong Focus on the Work of Mary Ellen Mark...
06/01/2018

Thank you for visiting, Heather! To schedule a tour of Looking for Home: A Yearlong Focus on the Work of Mary Ellen Mark email [email protected]

Thank you Anna Lovatt for bringing your Picturing Children class for a tour! We are now offering appointment only docent...
04/19/2018

Thank you Anna Lovatt for bringing your Picturing Children class for a tour! We are now offering appointment only docent-led tours. To schedule a tour email: [email protected]

EXHIBITION UPDATEThe progressive and incremental inaugural exhibition, Looking for Home: A Yearlong Focus on the Work of...
04/18/2018

EXHIBITION UPDATE

The progressive and incremental inaugural exhibition, Looking for Home: A Yearlong Focus on the Work of Mary Ellen Mark, continues to evolve.

Looking for Home: A Yearlong Focus on the Work of Mary Ellen Mark will continue through the end of 2018. In late September, Tiny Revisited, 2014 will open in conjunction with a screening of the documentary TINY: The Life of Erin Blackwell at the Angelika Film Center Dallas. The film’s subject, Erin Blackwell, also known as “Tiny,” will join director, Martin Bell, after the screening for a Q&A.

The Museum of Street Culture is now offering appointment only tours.
To schedule a docent-led tour email: [email protected]

For more information: www.museumofstreetculture.org

We had such a wonderful time this weekend with our panel talk Dallas Art Fair featuring Alan Govenar, Suzanne Erickson, ...
04/16/2018

We had such a wonderful time this weekend with our panel talk Dallas Art Fair featuring Alan Govenar, Suzanne Erickson, and Justine Ludwig and our opening receptions at The Stewpot for Tiny’s Family Life and Photography and Social Justice!

Our Founding Director interviewing some of the photographers from the Junior and Venturing Crews of The Stewpot as our o...
04/14/2018

Our Founding Director interviewing some of the photographers from the Junior and Venturing Crews of The Stewpot as our opening begins!

We are excited to see our opening on Saturday, April 14th 6-8pm mentioned in D Magazine among the great things happening...
04/06/2018
An Insider’s Guide to the Busiest 10 Days of the Dallas Art World - D Magazine

We are excited to see our opening on Saturday, April 14th 6-8pm mentioned in D Magazine among the great things happening during the busiest 10 days of the Dallas art world! Thanks Darryl Ratcliff!

Make sure you also join us from 12-1pm on April 14 at the art fair for our panel discussion: Reinventing the Museum! (links to both of the events are in the comments)

With Aries season comes the most populated stretch of the arts calendar in Dallas. The next 10 days of the city-christened Dallas Arts Month include the Dallas Art Fair, a slew of gallery openings, numerous pop-ups, galas, and parties. (And afterparties. Accordingly, get ready to hang out more frequ...

The opening reception of “Tiny’s Family Life, 2003-2005” and “Photography and Social Justice” is happening on April 14 f...
03/30/2018

The opening reception of “Tiny’s Family Life, 2003-2005” and “Photography and Social Justice” is happening on April 14 from 6-8pm! That’s after our panel discussion at the Dallas Art Fair (April 14, 12-1pm). We hope to see you all there!

Vickie Gies, one of our docents, is STREETZine Vendor of the Month for March!Come get a tour or a STREETZine from her!
03/26/2018

Vickie Gies, one of our docents, is STREETZine Vendor of the Month for March!

Come get a tour or a STREETZine from her!

STREETZine Vendor of the Month
Having worked 44 years of her life, Vicki has experiences in a wide variety of areas. Through her varied jobs, she has learned how to work with others and how to treat those around her. These skills have in turn helped her become a successful STREETZine vendor. A vendor since February 2010, Vicki likes meeting people and answering their questions about STREETZine. “I greet them when they walk by and ask if they care to make a donation. If they do or don’t, I thank them and wish them a great day. I get a lot of smiles from people because I’m not rude or pushy. I give a lot of papers away—that’s usually how I get my sponsorships.” A hard worker, she is also a vendor service representative, docent for the Mary Ellen Mark: Images for the Museum of Street Culture exhibit at The Stewpot, wife, and artist.
For 27 years Vicki worked for Dallas County in various capacities. She is a former Dallas County deputy sheriff, a role she filled with pride for many years. However, the role of a deputy sheriff comes with its own dangers. One night she was attacked by two prisoners whom she was picking up from court. They had just been convicted of their crimes, and they wanted a way out. “January 7, 1982--I remember it like it was yesterday. They overpowered me, got my jail keys, thinking that my keys opened all of the doors in the courthouse, which they didn’t”. Vicki was severely beaten, ending up badly bruised and with two broken ribs. “It was a planned escape. When they were captured three days later, they told the sheriff that if it had been the guy (deputy sheriff) that picked them up, they would have killed him. I thought they were going to kill me. It took me awhile to get over that.”
Vicki says that she grew up in a somewhat comical family and has a good sense of humor because of it. Vicki likes to tell how her mother was in labor for two full days with her—finally being born on February 26. “Can you imagine how my mom felt---she must have been ready to choke me!” she says with a chuckle. An only child, she was the apple of her father’s eye. She grew up in a very happy home with loving parents. Her father was a gospel musician, and the family moved around a lot between music companies to accommodate his career. They finally set roots in Dallas in 1964 when he became an organist for a funeral home.
After her parents passed away, and no longer working for the county, Vicki felt lost. She had no family to turn to for emotional support. “I turned to my friends, who were using drugs, and one thing led to another—it happens.” She began abusing drugs, panhandling, and shoplifting. Intervention was around the corner, though. “Even though I didn’t agree with it at the time, God did me a favor and had me arrested in 2008. The court sent me to rehab at Wilmer (Creuzot Judicial Treatment Center) for a six month program. I didn’t like it at first because I didn’t think I had a problem—everyone else had a problem. Not me—I’m fine. But after I was there for a couple of months, I actually started learning things. I learned a lot about myself. The emotional support plus the self-esteem I began to get--I learned how to live all over again.” When she was released from Wilmer, she went into transitional housing. But it didn’t last. She met a guy who was into drugs and she spiraled right back into the life she thought that she had left behind. She became homeless again for about a year. Finally, she made a decision for herself—she had to get back to where she was before. “I got sick and tired of being sick and tired, and I put myself into rehab this time. I went to Nexus Recovery Center, and did the IOP (intensive outpatient program) and SOP (supportive outpatient program).” After finishing both programs, probation, and paying restitution, the judge in charge of her case dismissed all charges, and they no longer show up on her record.
Vicki and her husband, Bill, have plans for their future. Their hope is that Bill, who has lung cancer, will be approved for disability soon so that they can move out of homelessness. They would like to find a house with a yard for their three dogs and four cats. In addition to being animal lovers, they love nature—enjoying fishing, walking their dogs, and just being outside. An artist at heart, Vicki likes to crochet and draw. She once won third place in photography in the Creative Arts contest at the State Fair of Texas. Vicki would like to get involved in The Stewpot art program soon so that she can get back to drawing. Bill wants to take her back to his native Minnesota someday to see where he grew up.With a smile, Vicki adds that she would like to go, but not in winter. “I’m from the south—I can’t take the cold.”
Vicki likes to set up shop at the intersection of Main and Akard streets in downtown Dallas. Her vendor number is Z-1770.

We hung out with teens in the Junior and Venturing Crews of the The Stewpot to get more photos for their upcoming exhibi...
03/23/2018

We hung out with teens in the Junior and Venturing Crews of the The Stewpot to get more photos for their upcoming exhibition on Wednesday. Join us for the opening reception of “Photography and Social Justice” on Saturday, April 14 from 6-8pm!

We had such a great time yesterday making sculpture models with @dallaslibrarykids!
03/15/2018

We had such a great time yesterday making sculpture models with @dallaslibrarykids!

We will be at the @dallaspubliclibrary making sculpture models out of paper and pipe cleaners!
03/14/2018

We will be at the @dallaspubliclibrary making sculpture models out of paper and pipe cleaners!

Thank you Temple and May for visiting us today!
03/12/2018

Thank you Temple and May for visiting us today!

Thank you Maria and Jeffrey for visiting today!
03/07/2018

Thank you Maria and Jeffrey for visiting today!

Thank you Laura Evans for bringing your UNT College of Visual Arts + Design Art Museums class for a tour!
03/02/2018

Thank you Laura Evans for bringing your UNT College of Visual Arts + Design Art Museums class for a tour!

Our docents are amazing! They participate in The Stewpot's Open Art Program, Dallas Street Choir, and some are STREETZin...
02/28/2018

Our docents are amazing! They participate in The Stewpot's Open Art Program, Dallas Street Choir, and some are STREETZine vendors!

Bill has been a docent since The Museum's opening in October, and is The STREETZine's vendor of the month for February.
Visit Bill during our regular hours (MWF 12-1) for a docent tour or purchase a STREETZine from him.

Congratulations Bill!!

STREETZine Vendor of the Month
“I haven’t always been a nice boy.” These are the words that Bill, vendor #2411, uses to describe himself, but this description does not him justice. He is a husband, an animal lover, a responsible and dependable member of the STREETZine community, a docent for an art exhibit, and a cancer survivor.

Bill has been a vendor for STREETZine for a little over a year. During that time, he has proven that he is a very dependable guy. Every Wednesday afternoon, he is at his post inside The Stewpot, facilitating the distribution of the STREETZine paper to other vendors, fielding their questions and offering solutions to their dilemmas. Bill has a couple of spots downtown and one spot in North Dallas where he vends the paper. When asked what he likes best about vending, he replies “It’s the people. I like talking with them”.

Bill is also a docent for the Mary Ellen Mark: Images for the Museum of Street Culture exhibit, which is available for tours at The Stewpot on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. As a docent, he guides interested individuals through the photo exhibit, offering insight into homelessness, prostitution, drug use, and teenage pregnancy. Bill enjoys his job. He connects with the girl who is the subject of the exhibit, Erin Blackwell. She endured physical and emotional abuse from her mother, much like he endured from his foster mother.

Bill was raised by a foster family from the age of seven. He describes them as being “very abusive”. His foster mother was particularly abusive and unloving towards Bill. “Every summer, I never knew where I was going to go, either to friends of the family or to relatives. Everyone else in the family went on vacation. The summers that I did stay, I had to work for my foster dad. Get up at 5:00 am and be at the office at 6:30 in the morning and didn’t get back home until whenever. That’s hard for a 12 year old kid.” Bill asked his mother on her deathbed why she never let him go on vacation with the rest of the family. “She told me, ‘I didn’t think you’d want to go with us’—that was her answer!”

Bill worked very hard to complete an apprenticeship program in construction which included on-the-job training and technical instruction in school. “Once you start going to school and working, your hours get really long because you got to study after working all day. Sometimes I’d get called into the office at work and my boss (his foster father) would even give me surprise tests”. His hard work paid off, because Bill received a degree in construction technology. He worked in his foster father’s construction business in Minnesota. “I was making good money with the family, but I was also involved in some, let’s just say underground stuff”. Bill has been to prison three different times. “I wasn’t a nice boy. Once I got off paper (parole) twenty-something years ago, I said nope, that’s it. I ain’t going back to prison.” Bill came to Dallas looking for a job, but it wasn’t easy.

Bill credits Pastor Leon Birdd with S.O.U.L. Church and Hope Fellowship Church with turning his life around. S.O.U.L Church is a church without walls. It provides for the “physical and spiritual needs of the homeless”. That’s where he met and married his wife, Vicki, who is also a STREETZine vendor. While attending church there, members of Hope Fellowship Church noticed him and told him that they would pick him up at S.O.U.L. Church and take him to their church, too. “I didn’t use drugs, but I drank. Hope Fellowship is a biker church in Irving—come as you are, even if you come in messed up on drugs or alcohol, someone will talk to you and help you get set up in another place, get you off the streets, help you get clean. That’s what really turned my life around.”

Not only has Pastor Birdd provided spiritual guidance for Bill, he also calls or texts him to check on him from time to time. Bill was diagnosed with lung cancer about two years ago and has undergone surgery and chemotherapy. Bill was surprised to see Pastor Birdd in his hospital room after his surgery. “He came up to visit me at the hospital three times to check on me. It really surprised me, especially when I had tubes sticking out of my chest. It felt good to have someone visit me.” Bill is still struggling with his diagnosis, but has regular checkups to see how his health is progressing.

Bill and his wife have been experiencing homelessness for about a year. They have a camp where they live with their dogs and cats. The recent bad weather has not been good to them. Flooding rains and freezing temperatures have been challenging. However, that doesn’t get Bill down. He is always on time to work and pleasant. Look for Bill next time you want to buy a STREETZine paper—he’ll be glad to talk to you.

02/27/2018
Picturing Homelessness

For the second installation of "Looking for Home: A Yearlong Focus on the Work of Mary Ellen Mark", we partnered with The Stewpot's Saturday Kids' Club participants (children grades 1-5) to create "Picturing Homelessness". The video below shows an in-depth look at its creation.

Come by to see "Picturing Homelessness" on the building at the corner of Young Street and Park Avenue in Encore Park Dallas! To receive a free docent-led tour of "Looking for Home" visit M,W,F 12-1pm or by appointment by emailing [email protected]

The Museum of Street Culture, in association with the Mary Ellen Mark Foundation, features 30 years of Marks' photographs of Erin Blackwell Charles, a.k.a.…

Streetwise just ended and our discussion with Martin Bell has begun!
02/25/2018

Streetwise just ended and our discussion with Martin Bell has begun!

T-Minus 30 mins until Streetwise starts!
02/25/2018

T-Minus 30 mins until Streetwise starts!

Thank you for the announcement Glasstire! We think partnering with Nasher Sculpture Center is pretty cool too!Join us TH...
02/23/2018
The Nasher Gets Streetwise – Glasstire

Thank you for the announcement Glasstire! We think partnering with Nasher Sculpture Center is pretty cool too!

Join us THIS Sunday, February 25 at 2pm at Nasher Sculpture Center for a screening of Streetwise and conversation with the film's director, Martin Bell.

This Sunday, February 25 at 2pm, the Nasher Sculpture Center will screen the 1984 Academy Award-nominated documentary Streetwise (1h 31min), followed by Streetwise filmmaker Martin Bell in conversation with founding director of Dallas’ Museum of Street Culture Alan Govenar. If a documentary about ...

Thank you D Magazine for featuring us! Don't forget to join us this Sunday at 2pm at Nasher Sculpture Center for our scr...
02/19/2018
The Museum of Street Culture Wants You To Rethink Homelessness

Thank you D Magazine for featuring us!

Don't forget to join us this Sunday at 2pm at Nasher Sculpture Center for our screening of Streetwise and a conversation with Martin Bell!

In its first exhibition, the ambitious Encore Park project shows how it can give a voice to a misunderstood community.

Today we had our first Spanish speaking visitor! Our docent, Misty, gave a flawless tour in Spanish! Visit us M,W,F 12-1...
02/16/2018

Today we had our first Spanish speaking visitor! Our docent, Misty, gave a flawless tour in Spanish! Visit us M,W,F 12-1pm The Stewpot ¡Hoy tuvimos nuestro primer visitante que habla español! ¡Nuestro docente, Misty, hizo un recorrido impecable en español! Visítanos L,M, V 12-1

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1822 Young Street
Dallas, TX
75201

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The Museum of Street Culture

The Museum of Street Culture is located in Encore Park in the heart of an historic area of downtown Dallas, flanked by the Farmers Market, City Hall, and the Main Street District. Our mission is to validate the history and experience of people in public places through diverse forms of art, education, and new ideas activating social change and building community. The Museum is a place where trained and untrained artists will collaborate and create art independently, involving people who live in the street and who work in the street. ​We embrace new ideas of art and culture by breaking down stereotypes and igniting social change in an ongoing dialogue through its exhibitions, collection, and public programs. The Museum of Street Culture will engage all areas of Encore Park, including The Stewpot, the 508 amphitheater, 508 Park, Community Garden, and 515 Park.

Pioneered by The Stewpot of First Presbyterian Church of Dallas and formally organized as a non-profit organization in 2013, Encore Park is a community of social and cultural services located on the south side of Young Street and on the east and west sides of the 500 block of Park Avenue. Encore Park brings together people of all cultures and faiths through dialogue, education, service, music, and art in the pursuit of abundant life, building community at the crossroads of creativity and caring.

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Comments

This is so exciting. Can't wait for the opening.