The American Horticultural Society

The American Horticultural Society Our vision: A land of sustainable gardens, cultivated by a diverse population with a common passion for plants. Support the AHS today by becoming a member! Join online at www.ahsgardening.org/join.
The American Horticultural Society (AHS) is a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization.
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AHS is one of the most longstanding and highly regarded member-based national gardening organizations in North America. The Society’s membership includes nearly 20,000 avid gardeners and horticultural professionals, as well as numerous regional and national partner organizations. Through its educational programs, awards, and publications, AHS connects people to gardening, raises awareness of earth-friendly gardening practices, introduces children to plants, brings together leaders to address important national issues, and showcases the art and science of horticulture. AHS's headquarters at River Farm in Alexandria, Virginia is a national showcase for gardening and horticultural practices.

Mission: To share with all Americans the critical role of plants, gardens, and green spaces in creating healthy, livable communities and a sustainable planet

May is Membership Month at the American Horticultural Society (AHS), and all month long we're recognizing friends like y...
05/01/2020

May is Membership Month at the American Horticultural Society (AHS), and all month long we're recognizing friends like you for all you do to help promote sustainable gardening and build a community of responsible caretakers of the Earth.

During Membership Month, we've set a goal of expanding our AHS family by 100 members by May 31 to bring our programs and resources to more people across the country. To show our gratitude, when you join AHS in May 2020 with a donation of $25 or more—a savings of $10 off the regular membership rate—we'll send you a FREE reusable, foil-insulated lunch bag!

You'll also receive all the benefits of membership, including a free subscription to The American Gardener magazine, seed and plant discounts, book discounts, and more.

Support our Membership Month Challenge by joining today: https://bit.ly/2KQhrku

#AHSMembershipMonth

The American Horticultural Society's cover photo
05/01/2020

The American Horticultural Society's cover photo

04/30/2020
Chasing Bugs

Congrats to American Horticultural Society (AHS) member Danae Wolf -- a photographer, educator, & naturalist, on the recent premiere of her mini documentary on "Chasing Bugs" featuring experts like Doug Tallamy.

Like what you see? Stay tuned for the May/June issue of our membership magazine, The American Gardener, which will feature Danae's piece on "Learning to Love Bugs." Not an AHS member? Look out for our special May #MembershipMonth deal starting tomorrow!

Please enjoy the world premiere of Chasing Bugs, the film!

I've dedicated many hours over the last two years on this solo film project and I’m so excited to finally bring it to all of you!

Insects and other arthropods are fundamental to the health of our world, yet, many view insects as little more than pests. Chasing Bugs explores the decline of insects while highlighting their global importance. Experts weigh in on media reports of insect decline and offer advice for conserving these beautiful animals in the home landscape.

Back in 1961, miconia -- a plant native to Central and South America -- was brought to the Wahiawa Botanical Garden on O...
04/30/2020
Butterfly proposed to help take a bite out of invasive miconia | News, Sports, Jobs - Maui News

Back in 1961, miconia -- a plant native to Central and South America -- was brought to the Wahiawa Botanical Garden on Oahu as an ornamental plant. Each miconia plant can produce more than 20,000 seeds per fruiting season, which can remain viable for more than 16 years. By 1991, the first efforts to control miconia began in Hawaii, and the plant was declared a noxious weed the following year.

While invasive species experts have tried using pesticides in the past to control the plant, entomologists have been researching biocontrol methods involving insects and pathogens. Now, state agencies are proposing that a small butterfly that naturally feeds on miconia in Costa Rica -- the Euselasia chrysippe -- be introduced to parts of Hawaii.

Via The Maui News

#InvasivePlants #Biocontrol #Butterflies

A small butterfly that naturally feeds on miconia in Costa Rica could be brought in to help control the invasive tree that’s taken over large swaths of forest

04/29/2020
CBS News

❤️

A Dutch flower farm created a special message in their tulips and daffodils, letting tourists know they are closed for now, but everyone is welcome back next spring season.

Gloves are a hot commodity right now. For those of us who currently are weeding, building new garden plots, planting, or...
04/29/2020
Five Tips for Buying Great Gardening Gloves – American Horticultural Society

Gloves are a hot commodity right now. For those of us who currently are weeding, building new garden plots, planting, or doing other yard work, gardening gloves are virtually a necessity.

With Mother's and Father's Day coming up, it's worth looking at how to choose the best gardening gloves this season. The American Horticultural Society's associate director for horticulture Dan Scott offers five tips for buying great gardening gloves.

#Gardening #Gloves

AHS News & Blog Five Tips for Buying Great Gardening Gloves For many years, I preferred doing gardening tasks barehanded. Not only did I enjoy the feeling of getting my “hands in the dirt,” but I often found that working with gloves reduced my ability to handle small, delicate plants with care. ...

🤔 Not a bad idea...
04/28/2020

🤔 Not a bad idea...

While many public gardens across the nation are still temporarily closed, a few have chosen to remain open. The Harvard ...
04/28/2020
Director explains why the Arnold Arboretum remains open

While many public gardens across the nation are still temporarily closed, a few have chosen to remain open.

The Harvard Gazette recently interviewed the director of the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, one of our Reciprocal Admissions Program gardens, about its decision to remain open, how the arboretum is keeping staff and visitors safe, and how they are serving as a model for other public outdoor spaces.

#PublicGardens

Director William “Ned” Friedman explains the rationale for keeping the Arboretum open during the pandemic.

Our friends at the National Cherry Blossom Festival are giving away Gnome garden statues as part of their #ShareTheBloom...
04/27/2020

Our friends at the National Cherry Blossom Festival are giving away Gnome garden statues as part of their #ShareTheBloom campaign. Simply upload a photo of something growing in your garden/home to their website by May 22 for a chance to win: https://nationalcherryblossomfestival.org/share-your-bloom/

And away. we. go! 🏃‍♂️
We're giving away 100 Petal the gnome statues during the #ShareYourBloom contest! Are you gardening at home? Snap and upload your photos here https://bit.ly/3awxDls for a chance to be a weekly winner! Here are a few from this week 🏅

Over the past month, garden centers, nurseries, and greenhouses across the nation have either been doing brisk business ...
04/27/2020
Pressure grows for all garden centers to reopen as planting season fast approaches

Over the past month, garden centers, nurseries, and greenhouses across the nation have either been doing brisk business or suffering financially, depending on the state in which they're located. Many of the businesses that have remained open (or reopened) have adopted new ways of meeting customers' needs in a safe manner, such as via online ordering and curbside pick-up.

In the state of Michigan, as of this past Friday, garden centers are officially allowed to resume operations, as long as safety precautions are put in place. Meanwhile, in Pennsylvania, pressure is mounting for a similar step.

Via PennLive.com

#GardenCenters #Greenhouses #Nurseries

A steady stream of customers made their way to Highland Gardens in Lower Allen Township on Saturday to buy flowers, seeds and shrubs. But not all garden centers across the state are permitted to be open. Now state lawmakers are calling on the governor to fix that.

Over the past month, we've been highlighting some of the amazing virtual tours and activities of our 330+ Reciprocal Adm...
04/24/2020
When the Going Gets Tough, Botanic Gardens Keep Growing

Over the past month, we've been highlighting some of the amazing virtual tours and activities of our 330+ Reciprocal Admissions Program (RAP) gardens. In this Atlas Obscura piece, representatives of four RAP gardens, Chicago Botanic Garden, San Francisco Conservatory of Flowers, The Morton Arboretum, and Smith College Botanic Garden, discuss how they're taking care of their plants while remaining temporarily closed to the public.

Learn more about our Reciprocal Admissions Program and the benefits it provides to American Horticultural Society members: ahsgardening.org/rap

#BotanicGardens

Watering and weeding can't wait until the pandemic has passed.

The U.S. Army's natural resources program, one of the larger such programs within the Department of Defense, has helped ...
04/23/2020
Army at Schofield Barracks helps save native Hawaiian plant species

The U.S. Army's natural resources program, one of the larger such programs within the Department of Defense, has helped save three native plant species in Hawaii from extinction, reports the Honolulu Star-Advertiser.

Thanks to a seed lab with 12 million seeds at Schofield Barracks, as well as greenhouses containing endangered and threatened plants, the Army has helped save the haha, Hawaiian mint, and tree aster from extinction. In addition, a natural resources biologist at one of the Army greenhouses says they've boosted populations of the state flower, the native yellow Hibiscus brackenridgei, in the wild, where it has been endangered and susceptible to wildfires.

#NativePlants

Despite COVID-19, life goes on for the Army in Hawaii, and that includes training and readiness, continuing construction and renovation, and on this 50th anniversary of Earth Day, celebrated today, the ongoing management of over 120 endangered and threatened native species in Hawaii.

Seed saving is beneficial for many reasons, including for economic ones. By saving seeds from certain crops this year, y...
04/22/2020
Gardening is Important, But Seed Saving is Crucial | Civil Eats

Seed saving is beneficial for many reasons, including for economic ones. By saving seeds from certain crops this year, you can avoid having to purchase those seeds next year, according to Philip Kauth, director of preservation at the Seed Savers Exchange.

Kauth suggests that newbies to seed saving start by saving seeds from beefsteak tomatoes or beans, because the seeds are large and the plants recognizable to most people.

Besides being cost-effective, seed saving helps preserve food culture and results in plants better adapted to climatic conditions. Seeds are also fun to trade. During this extended homebound period, some libraries have started online seed exchanges, mailing free seeds to interested residents in anticipation that the borrowers will return a new set of seeds to library catalogs after the harvest season.

Via Civil Eats
#SeedSaving #SeedExchange #HeirloomSeeds

Experts say seed saving is an important piece of the food sovereignty puzzle. Plus: Video seed saving tips to ensure next year’s crop.

A picture of one of our Reciprocal Admissions Program gardens recently won top honors in the RHS - Royal Horticultural S...
04/21/2020
Stunning Image of Lurie Garden Takes Top Prize in International Photo Competition

A picture of one of our Reciprocal Admissions Program gardens recently won top honors in the RHS - Royal Horticultural Society's annual photo competition. Congrats to the photographer from Illinois!

An image of Lurie Garden in full summer bloom—and it’s “wonderfully romantic glow”—was declared the overall winner in the Royal Horticultural Society’s annual competition.

Did you know Marie Antoinette's favorite tree was the Virginia tulip (Liriodendron tulipifera) and that her private gard...
04/21/2020
Marie Antoinette's Private Garden at Versailles Is Being Restored to Its Former Glory

Did you know Marie Antoinette's favorite tree was the Virginia tulip (Liriodendron tulipifera) and that her private garden at Château de Versailles was filled with plants from North America?

Since falling into disrepair after her death, the Queen's Grove has not been heavily used, but now a two-year restoration project has begun. The garden will be reinstated to its original design with many of the plants Marie Antoinette loved, including Virginia tulip trees planted this past winter.

Learn more about the project on the Chateau's website: https://bit.ly/2RVmKTG

Via Travel + Leisure

#Gardens #VirginiaTulip #Trees

Marie Antoinette’s private garden, also known as the Queen’s Grove (Le Bosquet de la Reine), will be going under restoration to put it back to its former glory.

True?  🤔H/T The Tattooed Gardener at one of our wonderful Canadian #RAPgardens, Toronto Botanical Garden
04/20/2020

True? 🤔

H/T The Tattooed Gardener at one of our wonderful Canadian #RAPgardens, Toronto Botanical Garden

With the 50th anniversary of Earth Day coming up on Wednesday, April 22, organizations across the country are promoting ...
04/20/2020
Rutgers Cooperative Extension launches 'Earth Day at Home' | Gardener State

With the 50th anniversary of Earth Day coming up on Wednesday, April 22, organizations across the country are promoting ways you can safely celebrate at home, including via gardening-related activities.

In New Jersey, the Rutgers Cooperative Extension is launching a webinar series called "Earth Day at Home" for anyone who wants to take small steps to protect the environment. Starting tonight at 6:30 pm Eastern, the webinar series will run weekly through June 29. Tonight's webinar will focus on soil health and how to deal with soil compaction. Learn more: https://bit.ly/2RT6gvk

On the west coast, CSUN Sustainability has launched a "virtual victory garden" campaign to encourage growing food at home and is providing free seeds to those who sign up for the campaign. The institute also is featuring virtual guest speakers, including master gardener and garden communicator Yvonne Savio discussing container gardening on Wednesday, April 22 at noon Pacific. Learn more: https://bit.ly/2VD4gZa

Via MyCentralJersey & California State University, Northridge
#EarthDay2020

In celebration of the 50th anniversary of Earth Day in 2020, has announced the launch of a webinar series called “Earth Day at Home.”

Tulips are in full bloom at several prominent garden locations around the world, even if they only can be viewed in pict...
04/17/2020
Tulips bloom by the thousands in colorful display at Hershey Gardens

Tulips are in full bloom at several prominent garden locations around the world, even if they only can be viewed in pictures or via virtual tours.

The Indira Gandhi Memorial Tulip Garden in Srinigar, Kashmir -- the largest tulip garden in Asia -- is home to 1.3 million tulips that are in full bloom but only visible to the gardeners working there: https://bit.ly/2yp2OBw (via The Week)

In The Netherlands, although the annual Tulip Festival Amsterdam was canceled, Keukenhof -- the world's largest bulb-flower garden with seven million planted for this year's display -- is featuring "Keukenhof Virtually Open." The video series features fresh programming each week, including displays of its multicolored tulips: https://bit.ly/2VCNE3F

And at Hershey Gardens, one of our Reciprocal Admissions Program (RAP) gardens in Hershey, Pa., more than 24,000 tulips of 70 varieties are in peak bloom, according to PennLive.com.

View more of our RAP garden virtual tours: https://bit.ly/3er3dEe

#Tulips

The annual tulip display is a tradition that began in 1942.

This afternoon, we'd like to pay tribute to a special person with a lifelong love of horticulture/botany and with many c...
04/16/2020

This afternoon, we'd like to pay tribute to a special person with a lifelong love of horticulture/botany and with many connections to the American Horticultural Society (AHS).

Gilbert S. Daniels, who passed away April 14 in Athens, Ohio, was once the youngest participant (at age 7) in the Brooklyn Botanic Garden's children's program. In 1944, he was one of 40 students across the nation who won the 3rd Annual Science Talent Search for the Westinghouse Scholarships with his paper that focused on the future use of plants in pharmacology.

After working in the computer industry for several years, he pursued a doctorate in botany at UCLA and became assistant director (and later director) of the Hunt Botanical Library at Carnegie Mellon University, transforming the library into the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation.

Dr. Daniels met his wife Emily while leading an AHS botanical tour on the Amazon, and for three decades, they maintained a renowned garden in Indianapolis. Photos of the garden are archived at the Smithsonian Institution.

A well-known editor and author, Dr. Daniels wrote a number of articles for "American Horticulturist" -- the predecessor to AHS's "The American Gardener" -- and was an officer of AHS from 1969-1983, serving most recently as president and acting executive director.

We are grateful to Dr. Daniels for his many years of service to the AHS and for his contributions to the worlds of botany and horticulture.

View his full obituary: https://legcy.co/3bdRPcM

Read his "President's Page" column on gardening books from the October/November 1980 issue of American Horticulturist:https://ahsgardening.org/wp-content/pdfs/1980-05r.pdf

Via Legacy.com & IndyStar

Two nice stories from the Finger Lakes region of New York:The Ithaca Children's Garden, one of our Reciprocal Admissions...
04/16/2020
Children's Garden gives out plants, launches at-home program during coronavirus crisis

Two nice stories from the Finger Lakes region of New York:

The Ithaca Children's Garden, one of our Reciprocal Admissions Program gardens, recently gave out 97 houseplants to kids enrolled in an after-school program, as well as another 200 houseplants to families, as part of its Community Grows project. The garden, which was one of the sites visited during the American Horticultural Society's (AHS) 2018 National Children & Youth Garden Symposium, also has launched [email protected], a virtual program to help improve residents' well-being.

Meanwhile, the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County's Blocks in Bloom program, which unites low-income communities in the city of Rochester by providing free perennials to residents, received AHS's Community Greening Award. The program has grown from serving two blocks with 15 households in 2014 to serving 15 blocks with 135 households in 2019. Learn more: https://bit.ly/3aeHAU8

Via ithacajournal.com / Ithaca Journal & Messenger Post Media/Monroe County Post

#CommunityGreening #ChildrensGardens #RAPGardens #GreatAmericanGardeners

The Ithaca Children's Garden has given hundreds of houseplants to families to help them connect with nature and relieve stress during the pandemic.

Good News! We've reached 50 donors and just under $4K in our #Spring2ACTion fundraiser for the American Horticultural So...
04/15/2020

Good News! We've reached 50 donors and just under $4K in our #Spring2ACTion fundraiser for the American Horticultural Society at River Farm!

Can you help us get to $5K by this evening? We'd be very grateful for your support!

Donate here: https://bit.ly/2VxIiqB

#SustainableGardens #NonProfit

Wondering how you can repurpose materials from around the house when starting your own vegetable garden? Never fear - we...
04/15/2020
11 Sustainable Gardening Hacks for Your Home Garden – American Horticultural Society

Wondering how you can repurpose materials from around the house when starting your own vegetable garden? Never fear - we've pulled together a list of 11 sustainable gardening hacks for your home garden: https://bit.ly/2z4iWcb

#SustainableGardening #ReduceReuseRecycle

News & Press 11 Sustainable Gardening Hacks for Your Home Garden If you’re part of the new wave of home or apartment dwellers looking for resources on starting an edible garden, you’re not alone. While the American Horticultural Society encourages supporting local garden centers, there are lots ...

Address

7931 E Boulevard Dr
Alexandria, VA
22308

General information

Visit our beautiful garden headquarters at River Farm in Alexandria, VA. For seasonal news and photos of bucolic River Farm, "like" the River Farm page https://www.facebook.com/RiverFarm

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(703) 768-5700

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Founded nearly a century ago, the American Horticultural Society’s mission is to share with all Americans the critical role of plants, gardens, and green spaces in creating healthy, livable communities and a sustainable planet.

We educate Americans about and advocate Earth-friendly and sustainable gardening practices, as well as model them at our River Farm headquarters in Alexandria, Virginia.

Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/AHS_Gardening and on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/am_hort_society/.

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Comments

WHEN oh WHEN is the 2020 RAP list going to be available?
This tree is in Ontario CA, do you know what it might be? Thank you!
100 Million Milkweed Seeds! Minneapolis, MN — October 15, 2019 — The Save Our Monarchs Foundation is devoted to saving the monarch butterfly from extinction by promoting the planting of milkweed across the US. The good news is that in 2018-2019 the migration from Mexico to the US was up 140% over the previous year, the first time since 1992 that there has been an increase. We would like to offer our sincere gratitude to everyone across North America who has rallied to this cause, planting their own pollinator gardens and especially the thousands of participants in Save Our Monarchs who had a direct hand in the repopulating of the monarch. In five years, Save Our Monarchs has distributed over 100 MILLION milkweed seeds, which contributed significantly to the recent increase in the monarch population. Monarch butterflies can only survive by eating the leaves of the milkweed plant. The population of these plants is down by over 90% since 1992. In that same period of time, the monarch butterfly has also declined by 92% according to experts. Further, since the early nineties, monarch colonies overwintering in Mexico occupied about 52 acres. By the winter of 2017, monarchs only occupied 1.6 acres, due to the loss of habitat stemming from land development and the widespread spraying of weed killer on the fields where they live. Much more info is available at the Save Our Monarchs website, and also at Facebook.com/SaveOurMonarchs. Please note that all of Save Our Monarchs activities are possible only through donations from people like you. So please help support our efforts by donating online or by mail: SaveOurMonarchs Foundation, PO Box 390135, Minneapolis, MN 55439. We thank you and the monarchs thank you.
Hello, nature has given me lots of reasons to better my self and change a lil bit of what sorrounds me. A color inviting place that people may enjoy. That makes me really happy in a way....
to view more of my flower paintings please visit josephgenovafineart.com
To view more of my flower paintings, please visit josephgenovafineart.com
Great organization. I am quite happy to be a member. 📸
Dr. Linda Chalker-Scott is offering a NEW online class this fall as part of the University of Massachusetts Sustainable Food and Farming online program. The class, STOCKSCH 110 - Sustainable Horticulture, is an introduction to the applied plant and soil sciences necessary to managing gardens and landscapes sustainably. Check it out here:
Help!!!! These worms are eating up my cousins orange tree.... what are they and what does she do??
Can anyone identify this?
Does anyone know what kind of tree/shrub this is? I love in South Texas. Thanks