Coming together to create a Climate/Mobility Action Plan for Penang in 2020

Coming together to create a Climate/Mobility Action Plan for Penang in 2020 New Mobility Penang, June 2013. To be gradually developed into an open collaborative space in which we post and exchange information on specific ways & broader strategies for improving the quality of mobility services and public spaces for all in Penang.

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ITDP: George Town Could Become a Malaysian Best Practice in Transport (with notes and commentary)George Town, a scenic M...
19/03/2020

ITDP: George Town Could Become a Malaysian Best Practice in Transport (with notes and commentary)

George Town, a scenic Malaysian city on the island of Penang, is a culturally-significant and popular tourist destination. The city is a dense, beautiful collection of colonial-era and other historic, well-preserved architecture. Listed as a UNESCO World Culture Heritage site, George Town has long been an important center of trade in Penang, founded as an entry port by the British in the 1700s, and attracting traders and workers from all over the region. Today, George Town is a diverse mix of cultures, with influences of China, India, Indonesia, Burmese, the Arabic world, and many others, including the native Malays.

Editorial note: We have discussed this article in group peer sessions in recent months, and have agreed to highlight a certain number of key points advised by the ITDP team which in our view provide an excellent starting point for the revised mobility strategy for Penang in the years immediately ahead, starting in 2020. The original ITDP article of 4 March 2019 can be found at https://www.itdp.org/2019/03/04/george-town-cycling-walking-transport/ Your comments are particularly invited on any one or all of these critical points.

However, for tourists and locals alike, (1) access to the low-rise hodgepodge of shops, temples, and markets that cover the streets oriented to the still-active port, leaves much to be desired. Despite (2) its density and small streets perfectly suited to walking and cycling, (3) George Town suffers from the same car-oriented planning that plagues cities all over the world. (4) Most residents travel by car, and a lack of parking regulation enforcement means that cars typically block pedestrian spaces, and make cycling dangerous.

While the city does have (5) a quality bus transit system, Rapid Penang, (6) the lack of “last mile” connections and a (7) poor walking and cycling environment (8) prevents it from replacing car trips. Fortunately, the Penang state and city governments are (9) eager for change, and (10) have been working with the Asian Development Bank and ITDP Indonesia, (11) as well as together with local communities and organizations, to (12) tackle mobility problems in the city, increase tourism, and (13) improve its residents’ quality of life.

Over the last few years, the(14) collaboration between local communities, residents and the Government has resulted in the (15) George Town Special Area Master Plan. This plan includes (p) pedestrian improvements, such as (16) ensuring that sidewalks are connected and continuous, separated from cars, and five-feet wide. The (17) bike share program, LinkBike, launched in 2016, are being expanded to better serve residents and tourists, with a higher density of stations in high-traffic locations all over the city.

While the city (18) is making good progress, (19) George Town still has a ways to go (20) Enforcement remains an issue. In the central neighborhoods of Little India and Leb uh Campbell, the pedestrian-friendly design was implemented, but (21) cars still park illegally on the bike lane or on the traffic lane. (22) More investment in pedestrian and cycling infrastructure is needed, and (23) the existing infrastructure should be more segregated. (24) Installing parking bollards, covering the open sewers between the car and pedestrian spaces, and encouraging more active frontage at the street level would make the walking environment safer and more pleasant.

A (25) better walking and cycling environment would also make it much easier to access public transport. (26) Expanding Rapid Penang, the city’s bus system, and implementing a new higher-capacity transit system are essential to accommodate the daily trips made in George Town and throughout Penang, (27) proving a true alternative to car ownership. (28) This would also open up the potential of limiting cars in the city center, through design, parking restrictions, and road pricing. This would provide (29) much-needed public spaces for residents and tourists (30) to enjoy the city on foot and bike, making George Town more livable and enjoyable, and (31) inspiring other cities across the region and world to do the same.

ITDP: George Town Could Become a Malaysian Best Practice in Transport (with notes and commentary)- Source: George Town, ...
19/03/2020

ITDP: George Town Could Become a Malaysian Best Practice in Transport (with notes and commentary)
- Source:

George Town, a scenic Malaysian city on the island of Penang, is a culturally-significant and popular tourist destination. The city is a dense, beautiful collection of colonial-era and other historic, well-preserved architecture. Listed as a UNESCO World Culture Heritage site, George Town has long been an important center of trade in Penang, founded as an entry port by the British in the 1700s, and attracting traders and workers from all over the region. Today, George Town is a diverse mix of cultures, with influences of China, India, Indonesia, Burmese, the Arabic world, and many others, including the native Malays.

Editorial note: We have discussed this article in group peer sessions in recent months, and have agreed to highlight a certain number of key points advised by the ITDP team which in our view provide an excellent starting point for the revised mobility strategy for Penang in the years immediately ahead, starting in 2020. The original ITDP article of 4 March 2019 can be found at https://www.itdp.org/2019/03/04/george-town-cycling-walking-transport/ Your comments are particularly invited on any one or all of these critical points.

However, for tourists and locals alike, (1) access to the low-rise hodgepodge of shops, temples, and markets that cover the streets oriented to the still-active port, leaves much to be desired. Despite (2) its density and small streets perfectly suited to walking and cycling, (3) George Town suffers from the same car-oriented planning that plagues cities all over the world. (4) Most residents travel by car, and a lack of parking regulation enforcement means that cars typically block pedestrian spaces, and make cycling dangerous.

While the city does have (5) a quality bus transit system, Rapid Penang, (6) the lack of “last mile” connections and a (7) poor walking and cycling environment (8) prevents it from replacing car trips. Fortunately, the Penang state and city governments are (9) eager for change, and (10) have been working with the Asian Development Bank and ITDP Indonesia, (11) as well as together with local communities and organizations, to (12) tackle mobility problems in the city, increase tourism, and (13) improve its residents’ quality of life.

Over the last few years, the(14) collaboration between local communities, residents and the Government has resulted in the (15) George Town Special Area Master Plan. This plan includes (p) pedestrian improvements, such as (16) ensuring that sidewalks are connected and continuous, separated from cars, and five-feet wide. The (17) bike share program, LinkBike, launched in 2016, are being expanded to better serve residents and tourists, with a higher density of stations in high-traffic locations all over the city.

While the city (18) is making good progress, (19) George Town still has a ways to go (20) Enforcement remains an issue. In the central neighborhoods of Little India and Leb uh Campbell, the pedestrian-friendly design was implemented, but (21) cars still park illegally on the bike lane or on the traffic lane. (22) More investment in pedestrian and cycling infrastructure is needed, and (23) the existing infrastructure should be more segregated. (24) Installing parking bollards, covering the open sewers between the car and pedestrian spaces, and encouraging more active frontage at the street level would make the walking environment safer and more pleasant.

A (25) better walking and cycling environment would also make it much easier to access public transport. (26) Expanding Rapid Penang, the city’s bus system, and implementing a new higher-capacity transit system are essential to accommodate the daily trips made in George Town and throughout Penang, (27) proving a true alternative to car ownership. (28) This would also open up the potential of limiting cars in the city center, through design, parking restrictions, and road pricing. This would provide (29) much-needed public spaces for residents and tourists (30) to enjoy the city on foot and bike, making George Town more livable and enjoyable, and (31) inspiring other cities across the region and world to do the same.

Coming together to create a Climate/Mobility Action Plan for Penang in 2020's cover photo
18/03/2020

Coming together to create a Climate/Mobility Action Plan for Penang in 2020's cover photo

Small is beautiful. May we present Micro-mobility 2020?
18/03/2020

Small is beautiful. May we present Micro-mobility 2020?

Micro-mobility is a category of modes of transport that are provided by very light vehicles such as electric scooters, e...
18/03/2020

Micro-mobility is a category of modes of transport that are provided by very light vehicles such as electric scooters, electric skateboards, shared bicycles and electric pedal assisted, pedelec, bicycles. The primary condition for inclusion in the category is a gross vehicle weight of less than 500 kg. Additional conditions are the provision of a motor, primary utility use, and av

Micro-mobility’s 15,000-mile checkup

Article By Kersten Heineke, Benedikt Kloss, Darius Scurtu, and Florian Weig January 2019 | Source and full text, graphics and links: https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/automotive-and-assembly/our-insights/micromobilitys-15000-mile-checkup

Will the micro-mobility market boom or bust? With billions already invested, here’s an assessment of its potential.
Article (PDF-78KB)

Is the buzz surrounding shared micro-mobility1overwhelming its real-world potential? The business model has gained tremendous attention recently, as interest builds and new investment dollars flood into the space. But questions concerning the ultimate size and scope of the shared micromobility market have also emerged.

Micro-mobility rapidly attracts cash and customers

Stakeholders have invested more than $5.7 billion in micromobility start-ups since 2015, with more than 85 percent targeting China. The market has already attracted a strong customer base and has done so roughly two to three times faster than either car sharing or ride hailing. In just a few years, for instance, several micromobility start-ups have amassed valuations that exceed $1 billion.

Two circumstances have driven this accelerated expansion. First, most launches of shared micromobility take place in conducive environments. Urban consumers already value and use solutions for shared mobility, such as car sharing, ridesharing, and e-hailing. What’s more, micromobility appears to make people happy—it’s faster than car-based trips in many situations, and users often say the freedom of being in the fresh air traveling to their destinations while avoiding traffic jams puts a smile on their face. Micromobility is perceived as “intuitive mobility” by design—it’s easy and liberating to buzz through traffic. It’s really quite simple: people feel rejuvenated, and the experience takes them back to their first time riding a bicycle or a scooter.

Favorable economics ensure lower break-even points

Second, the economics of shared micromobility are largely favorable to industry participants. Companies find it much easier to scale up micromobility assets (for example, electric bikes) compared with car-based sharing solutions. For example, the current acquisition costs of an electric scooter are about $400, compared with the thousands of dollars required to purchase a car. Thus, while today’s car-sharing solutions need several years to become economically viable, an outside-in business-case estimate of a leader in shared mobility shows that an e-scooter could break even in less than four months (Exhibit 1).

More than a quarter of the world’s population lives in cities with more than one million inhabitants. And vehicle traffic speeds in many of those city centers are now averaging as little as 15 kilometers an hour (9 miles per hour). This can be a frustrating and stressful experience. Micromobility offers some city dwellers an escape from that stress: higher average speeds, less time spent waiting or parking, a lower cost of ownership, and the health benefits of being outdoors.

How big is the market?

How big is it? Micromobility could theoretically encompass all passenger trips of less than 8 kilometers (5 miles), which account for as much as 50 to 60 percent of today's total passenger miles traveled in China, the European Union, and the United States. For example, about 60 percent of car trips are less than 8 kilometers and could benefit from micromobility solutions, which could also cover roughly 20 percent of public-transport travel (in addition to closing the first- and last-mile gap) as well as all trips done by private bike, moped, scooter, or walking today.

However, we estimate that shared micromobility will cannibalize only about 8 to 15 percent of this theoretical market. Constraints include its suitability for relevant mobility use cases (for example, limited space when going shopping), customer adoption, weather conditions, age fit, and micromobility’s lower presence in rural areas.

Modeling a base-case market

We modeled the baseline shared micromobility market and created a forecast, which revealed a 2030 market potential of roughly $200 billion to $300 billion in the United States, $100 billion to $150 billion in Europe, and $30 billion to $50 billion in China. The main differences across regions stem from unique pricing-per-kilometer strategies when comparing today's micromobility businesses. For instance, EU pricing is about half that in the United States, while China’s is only roughly 20 percent of US pricing. In the future, such differences might shrink as pricing in some regions, such as China, increases.

The road to seamless urban mobility

Read the article

Our base-case estimate of the shared micromobility market across China, the European Union, and the United States is, thus, $300 billion to $500 billion in 2030 (Exhibit 2). To put that into perspective, it equals about a quarter of our forecasted global shared autonomous-driving market potential of roughly $1,600 billion in 2030.

While the base case represents a healthy market, the question arises: What would you need to believe to grow the shared micromobility market into a truly disruptive trillion-dollar business?

For this market potential and mileage cannibalization to become a reality, cities need to support shared micromobility proactively. They could, for example, boost the micromobility business model further to resolve traffic pain points and congestion problems. Actions might include banning cars (but not e-scooters) from congested or polluted districts, or creating incentives for the use of micromobility for short trips by significantly increasing prices for car-based shared mobility. Cities could also install intermodal hubs to make the interchange between micromobility and public transport more convenient. However, micromobility players must tread carefully, since some cities today have been hesitant to adopt the service. Issues include customers who abandon old or damaged scooters on the street; safety concerns, which still play an important role; and the low entry barriers, which means that competitors could simply invest a bit more money to steal a player’s entire customer base.

The micromobility phenomenon has the potential to disrupt the industry. Whether the disruption it causes matches the hype generated so far will largely depend on how cities react to the service. While the industry is hoping urban governments view micromobility favorably as an antidote to congestion and pollution, and a way to provide consumers with an enjoyable alternative to gridlock, cities could instead see it negatively. In fact, some anecdotal evidence of the latter has already surfaced. Consequently, in addition to building their businesses, micromobility players will likely have to take proactive roles in lobbying for and shaping the industry in key urban areas.

About the author(s)

Kersten Heineke is a partner in McKinsey’s Frankfurt office, where Benedikt Kloss is a consultant; Darius Scurtu is an analyst in the Munich office, where Florian Weig is a senior partner.

Creative Commons – attribution

Thanks McKinsey -

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More on Micro-mobility:
Google on micromobility - http://bit.ly/31Gyv3N
Wikipedia on micromobility - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micromobility
Micromobility Safety at - http://bit.ly/2FeZOZf
Micromobility - Latest news/postings - http://bit.ly/2XTZAOm
Micromobility / France - http://bit.ly/2Kl6LMx

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About the editor, World Streets

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Coming together to create a Climate/Mobility Action Plan for Penang in 2020
18/03/2020

Coming together to create a Climate/Mobility Action Plan for Penang in 2020

20/02/2020

This picture from a presentation by the Chief Minister of their highly climate-destructive "transport master plan"

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TOWARD A NEW MOBILITY CLIMATE ACTION/PLAN: 2020

WORLD STREETS is betting its future over the coming two-year transition period on the ability of certain ambitious responsible cities, nations, organizations and citizens in different parts of the world to come together to break the downward pattern of climate stress — and specifically plan and execute highly aggressive initiatives aimed at reducing near-term greenhouse gas emissions from the mobility sector. And doing all this while working with tools, policies and strategies that harness proven, cost-effective, readily available, measures, technologies, operational and management competence. And our job is to support them as best we can.

NEAR TERM: The time horizons that are being cited for making major cuts in the environmental load are, in our views, irresponsible. There is no reason to wait any longer, and every reason to attack the challenge immediately. And we are here to support this mobility revolution. The idea is to be judged by the announced public targets and achieved results in the year immediately following the program startup date.

MORE WITH LESS: Here are a couple of acronyms that are central to these proven tools and strategies — TDM, ICT, VKT, TSM, ITS, MaaS, HOV, LOV, LOS, PBS, . . . among a long list of others– that you are already familiar with and will see developed in the articles, pages and references that follow here. Ways in which to do more with less. And . . . / Better / Faster / Cheaper. To get a better feeling for this, check out our TDM Primer at https://worldstreets.wordpress.com/tag/tdm-primer/.

ECOSYSTEM: For a well-prepared program, many sharp reductions can be achieved in a matter of months or a couple of years, as opposed to decades (or never). The great art lies in how we prepare them and then put them all together . . . so as to effectively redefine the entire underlying mobility ecosystem. As our Dutch colleague Marco Te Brömmelstroet put it so well: “The power of a new mobility concept depends not on how well it solves a problem . . . but on how many problems it (partly) solves “.

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